Page 20«..10..19202122..3040..»

Salem Man Arrested Following Disturbance in Salem Township Hospital Emergency Room – WJBD Online

A 28-year-old Salem man was taken to the Marion County Jail after being arrested for aggravated battery, disorderly conduct, and resisting arrest following an altercation that began in the Salem Township Hospital emergency room and continued when a sheriff’s deputy attempted to remove him.

Salem Police say Charles Hudson of South Rotan was taken to the emergency room after coming to the police department complaining of a shoulder injury from an earlier altercation. Hospital officials eventually determined Hudson didn’t need treatment and asked for him to be removed after he ripped off hospital equipment and began yelling at police and hospital personnel.

Hudson then allegedly fought being placed into a squad car and later kicked and tripped a deputy. He reportedly obtained a head injury by hitting his head against the cage in the squad car.

Hudson reportedly got into a fight with Travis Juds of Soper Road in Odin before coming to the police station after Jud’s car broke down near the South College and Kell Street intersection. Police say Juds received a bloody nose in the altercation. No charges were filed in connection with the original incident.

Read the rest here:
Salem Man Arrested Following Disturbance in Salem Township Hospital Emergency Room – WJBD Online

Read More...

Crazy Talk: I’m Suicidal. Should I Go to the Emergency Room? – Wear Your Voice

I went to the hospital because I was suicidal and the only alternative for me was dying, and I figured if that was the only alternative, I would give this living thing one last shot.

Welcome to Crazy Talk: a mental health advice column written by yours truly, a mentally ill and queer writer reclaiming his crazy to educate and empower. In a world that tries to push us to the margins, Im all about getting loud and kicking the stigma where it hurts. In this column, we explore what its like to live with mental illness without shame or apologies. Expect frank advice, a little self-deprecation and a good dose of humor.

Ive got to start this column off by saying because I care about you that if youre in crisis and need immediate resources, here are some you can utilize right now:

The National Suicide Prevention Helpline: 1-800-273-8255

The Trevor Lifeline for LGBTQIA+ youth: 1-866-488-7386

Trans Lifeline: 1-877-565-8860

If youre not into chatting on the phone (Im not either, I get it), learn more about the Crisis Text Line by clicking here. Remember, this is an advice column written by a mentally ill person not a clinician so theadvice that Im giving you shouldnt replace the support youd get from a mental health professional.

Phew. Okay. Are we ready?

This last year, I was hospitalized not once, but twice. I was deeply depressed and suicidal and not only could I not take care of myself, but I also wasnt safe to be left alone. And as scared as I was to take myself to the emergency room, I realized it was the only way to keep myself alive.

Related:Why Checking Myself In To a Mental Hospital Was One of the Best Things Ive Done

But is it right for you? Its certainly not right for everyone. It can be hard to know when its time to seek out this kind of intervention. So I want to pose some questions as you consider psychiatric hospitalization:

In some communities, there are psychiatric crisis clinics that can get you in touch with a clinician immediately. There are also partial hospitalization programs (PHP), where you get the benefit of close supervision and care, but sleep in your own bed at the end of the day. There are intensive outpatient programs (IOP), which you attend during the day as well, and have a variety of schedules that youd keep depending on the program.

The accessibility of these options will depend on your location and insurance (and if you dont have good insurance or any insurance, dont give up! There are often specific resources that serve underinsured folks, depending on where you are).

The best way to sort through these options is to chat with an advocate, therapist, or psychiatrist in your area. When were in crisis, were not always in the best place to assess our state of mind and our options. When making an appointment, be ready to assert yourself; emphasize that while you arent in imminent danger, you need to see a clinician immediately. Dont back down, and bring in a loved one to help you with this process if need be.

You can also use a crisis line (like the ones I mentioned above) and ask for help making this decision. Its my understandingthat if you dont have access to clinicians, the emergency room can also refer you to these services as long as you arent in immediate danger. This will vary by location and hospital.

Typically, psychiatric hospitalization happens if youre a danger to yourself, a danger to others, or gravely disabled. Sometimes when psychosis is involved, a person might also be admitted depending on the severity and risk involved.

I knew that I needed to go to the emergency room because I couldnt be left alone for very long without imminent risk, and I wasnt able to tend to my basic needs (feeding myself, taking my medication, showering, etc).

The danger was evident: I had a plan. I was going to act if the opportunity presented itself. Frankly, I wasnt safe, and the other options available to me couldnt ensure my safety.

Immediate risks like these warrant immediate care. If this sounds like you, please dont wait reach out for help or go to the nearest emergency room.

If youre not sure of the immediacy, you can always talk to a crisis helpline to get perspective, or touch base with a clinician if one is available to you. You can also just go to the emergency room its their job to assess you. Going to the ER doesnt guarantee that youll be admitted to a facility, but it can help connect you with resources that you might not know about otherwise.

The last time I went to the hospital, I was on seven different medications, none of which were really working for me because I was incorrectly diagnosed as bipolar.

My psychiatrist later commented that his hands were tied because I was in crisis, it wasnt necessarily safe to start taking me off of my meds, nor did he have the option to keep adding medications. We were stuck.

I needed a safe space where I could quickly be taken off of large quantities of medication, be given new medications to stabilize me, and be supervised while it happened. So it made sense to hospitalize me we could make big changes in a very short amount of time, knowing that clinicians would be there 24/7 to support me through the process.

It turned out to be exactly what I needed. We completely reworked my medication regimen within a week, choosing more effective treatment options. When I left, I was on totally different meds and significantly less medication overall and I felt a lot more stable.

Thats one thing thats pretty great about psychiatric hospitals: Ideally, you can be stabilized in a shorter timeframe because your level of care and supervision allows for them to move quickly. If youre in crisis and you cant imagine waiting weeks or even months to get better, it makes sense to consider hospitalization.

The last time I was hospitalized, I packed a small suitcase.

I brought a soft throw blanket for comfort; plenty of books to read (I always find that graphic novels are the best for this sort of thing); lots of underwear, pajamas and fuzzy socks (drawstrings removed); and a journal for writing in. Theres a great online guide here to help you figure out what to pack when you go to the hospital.

Related:7 Key Ways to Break the Self-Injury Cycle for Good

It was incredibly helpful to have comforting items with me and ways to pass the time. Compared to the time that I brought nothing with me, the experience was like night and day. Knowing this is an option often helps folks feel a little bit safer about the possibility of being hospitalized.

If you arent sure if youll be going to the hospital, pack a bag anyway and keep it somewhere a loved one could retrieve it. If things hit a crisis point, youll already be prepared to go, or you can ask someone to get it for you and bring it to you later.

Hospitals are not fun places to be. But there are ways you can take control of the situation and make it a better experience for yourself and trust me, it makes a difference.

Its absolutely true especially for marginalized folks that a hospitalization likely will be traumatic in some way. There are so many contributing factors, including what facility youre sent to, whether or not the services you receive are culturally competent and the length and quality of your stay. Many of those factors are totally unpredictable.

Ive known people whove had very good hospitalization experiences. Just the same, Ive known many people who walked away feeling broken. You can find someone with every experience in-between. Some people vow never to step foot in a psychiatric facility again, which I empathize with; I wont sugarcoat that reality or dismiss the validity of it.

So why did I personally risk it more than once? I was desperate, plain and simple. I went to the hospital because the only alternative for me was dying, and I figured if that was the only alternative, I would give this living thing one last shot, one last push.

Friends often told me that there very well may be a future me a healthier, more whole person that would be endlessly grateful that I did. And they werent wrong.

Im that future me, right here and right now. Im happy and Im whole, thanks to the courageous decisions that I made at my darkest hour. Im better than I ever thought I could be. While thats not everyones truth, thats my truth.

Did the benefits outweigh the risks? The pain, the trauma, the fear that shattered me for a time? The short term was so much to endure, pain that I cant describe with words. But I would do it all over again if it meant getting me to the place that Im in now.

The messy reality is that something that deeply traumatized me more than once also kept me alive. I have to hold these truths at the same time.

I dont believe hospitalization is right for each and every person. I think we should all consider our options very carefully. But I think its also true that folks struggling with their mental health arent given a lot of good options in the first place which often means that we have to make difficult choices in order to survive, choices that may wound us deeply but simultaneously give us a fighting chance.

The truth is, theres no perfect choice. Theres no right choice, no good choice. Theres just choices risks that we take because theres always the hope that the risks are worth taking. Thats the reality of mental illness, and if you think about it, thats the reality of life. We hold our breath, put one foot in front of the other and hope for the best.

Should you go to the emergency room? I cant answer that for you. But I can speak for myself, and the complicated truth Ive found is this: For me, whatever its taken to survive emergency room or otherwise arerisks that have always been worth taking.

Excerpt from:
Crazy Talk: I’m Suicidal. Should I Go to the Emergency Room? – Wear Your Voice

Read More...

Here’s How Many People Cops Send To The Emergency Room A Year – Vocativ

For all the protests and outrage that incidents of police brutality have stoked from the public, there is still a wide gap of data showing how often our encounters with police take a turn for the worse.

Researchers and journalists alike have begun to meticulously measure how many people are killed by police, but theres much less attention paid to how many people they injure. A short new study published Wednesday in JAMA Surgery may be our best estimate yet.

Researchers studied data from the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample, which records the details of some 30 million visits to the emergency room annually. These visits in turn represent the more than 130 million visits estimated across the country every year. Over the years 2006 to 2012, they estimated that around 51,000 visits related to contact with law enforcement had occurred annually.

For context, the tally outnumbers annual visits caused by things like fireworks, playing certain sports, and domestic violence; as well as the number of annual injuries incurred by police officers while on duty.Compared against other research looking further back in the past, though, the number of visits hasnt changed much from year to year in quite some time.

While public attention has surged in recent years, we found these frequencies to be stable over 7 years, indicating that this has been a longer-term phenomenon, the authors wrote.

Of the visits, more than 80 percent involved men, most of whom lived in poorer and urban neighborhoods, and were more likely to take place in the South and West parts of the country. Patients were also more likely to reportedly be dealing with substance abuse and mental illness. Most injuries were caused by being struck, with less than 7 percent involving stab or gunshot wounds. 0.3 percent, or 1,202 visits, ended in death.

By providing a more up-to-date record of police-related injuries, the researchers hope it can serve as a baseline to evaluate the outcomes of national and regional efforts to reduce law enforcement-related injury.

Read the original:
Here’s How Many People Cops Send To The Emergency Room A Year – Vocativ

Read More...

Centra’s Bedford hospital expanding, will open temporary … – Lynchburg News and Advance

BEDFORD A $4 million expansion project that will increase the size of the Bedford Memorial Hospital emergency department by more than 30 percent will begin in June.

But before work gets underway, the hospital will open a temporary emergency department on the second floor starting May 18.

Bedford Memorial Hospital CEO Patti Jurkus said the newly renovated and expanded emergency department is planned to open in March 2018.

Jurkus and Stacey Hopkins, nursing director for the emergency department, held an information session Wednesday night at the Central Virginia Community College Bedford campus to inform the public of the upcoming change.

We are very excited about the opportunity to expand the emergency department, Jurkus said. We want the community to have easy access to the emergency department during this renovation.

While renovations are taking place, the emergency department will move to the second floor and use the entrance from the administrative parking lot located on Whitfield Drive.

The current emergency room is located on the opposite side of the hospital, past the entrance on Oakwood Street.

There will be a barrier constructed in the current parking lot on Whitfield Drive that will separate the EMS drop-off and walk-in patients.

The current main entrance of the hospital, meanwhile, will be used for outpatient visits only.

James Rose, director of facility services, said the new department will expand by 1,800 square feet, to about 7,500 square feet in size.

Hopkins said there has been an 11 percent increase in the number of emergency room patients during the past two years.

Expanding the emergency department marks Centras latest investment in the hospital. Centra and Carilion Clinic had run the hospital as part of a 50-50 partnership since 2001. Centra paid Carilion about $12 million and assumed ownership July 1, 2014.

That same year, officials said Centra would expand and update the hospitals emergency room, and Centra publicly committed to making an estimated $11 million to $12 million in capital investments in the hospital during the next five years, including infrastructural upgrades, advanced medical equipment and improvements to Oakwood Manor, the 111-bed health and rehabilitation center attached to the hospital. In May 2016, Centra announced it would reopen Bedford Hospice House.

Planning for the temporary emergency department has been ongoing, and Jurkus said she is thankful for the help of multiple community members who have offered support. The hospital has met with the sheriff, town police, neighbors, mental health workers and EMS officials to create the plan for the temporary department.

Additional staff of three nurses and 10 to 12 certified nurses assistants will be hired as well as a new switchboard operation of three full-time and two to four part-time workers that will be staffed 24/7, Hopkins said.

We love our hospital, love our community and want to provide best service possible, Jurkus said. We want the community to be informed, and we want to continue to provide our services.

See original here:
Centra’s Bedford hospital expanding, will open temporary … – Lynchburg News and Advance

Read More...

Centra’s Bedford hospital expanding, will open temporary emergency department – Roanoke Times

BEDFORD A $4 million expansion project that will increase the size of the Bedford Memorial Hospital emergency department by more than 30 percent will begin in June.

But before work gets underway, the hospital will open a temporary emergency department on the second floor starting May 18.

Bedford Memorial Hospital CEO Patti Jurkus said the newly renovated and expanded emergency department is planned to open in March 2018.

Jurkus and Stacey Hopkins, nursing director for the emergency department, held an information session Wednesday night at the Central Virginia Community College Bedford campus to inform the public of the upcoming change.

We are very excited about the opportunity to expand the emergency department, Jurkus said. We want the community to have easy access to the emergency department during this renovation.

While renovations are taking place, the emergency department will move to the second floor and use the entrance from the administrative parking lot located on Whitfield Drive.

The current emergency room is located on the opposite side of the hospital, past the entrance on Oakwood Street.

There will be a barrier constructed in the current parking lot on Whitfield Drive that will separate the EMS drop-off and walk-in patients.

The current main entrance of the hospital, meanwhile, will be used for outpatient visits only.

James Rose, director of facility services, said the new department will expand by 1,800 square feet, to about 7,500 square feet in size.

Hopkins said there has been an 11 percent increase in the number of emergency room patients during the past two years.

Expanding the emergency department marks Centras latest investment in the hospital. Centra and Carilion Clinic had run the hospital as part of a 50-50 partnership since 2001. Centra paid Carilion about $12 million and assumed ownership July 1, 2014.

That same year, officials said Centra would expand and update the hospitals emergency room, and Centra publicly committed to making an estimated $11 million to $12 million in capital investments in the hospital during the next five years, including infrastructural upgrades, advanced medical equipment and improvements to Oakwood Manor, the 111-bed health and rehabilitation center attached to the hospital. In May 2016, Centra announced it would reopen Bedford Hospice House.

Planning for the temporary emergency department has been ongoing, and Jurkus said she is thankful for the help of multiple community members who have offered support. The hospital has met with the sheriff, town police, neighbors, mental health workers and EMS officials to create the plan for the temporary department.

Additional staff of three nurses and 10 to 12 certified nurses assistants will be hired as well as a new switchboard operation of three full-time and two to four part-time workers that will be staffed 24/7, Hopkins said.

We love our hospital, love our community and want to provide best service possible, Jurkus said. We want the community to be informed, and we want to continue to provide our services.

See the original post here:
Centra’s Bedford hospital expanding, will open temporary emergency department – Roanoke Times

Read More...

NCH considers building emergency room in Estero – Wink News

ESTERO, Fla. The village may soon have two emergency rooms.

NCH Healthcare System plans to build a two-story, 40,000-square-foot medical center on the west side of U.S. 41 across from the Coconut Point mall. The center would include two surgical suites, support services for outpatient care and a freestanding, 24-hour emergency room.

The center would open during the fall of 2018. Lee Health recently announced its plans to spend $140 on a new outpatient facility and ER several blocks away from the proposed NCH center.

NCH will present its plan to Village Council in a meeting at 5:30 p.m. on April 26 at 5:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Village Hall Council Chambers at 9401 Corkscrew Palms Circle and is open to the public.

Resident Susan Woodworth is eager to have greater access to emergency care.

It would be five minutes from where I live, so it would be fabulous, she said. It would be beneficial we are getting older down here.

View post:
NCH considers building emergency room in Estero – Wink News

Read More...

Michael A. Clarke: If Republicans kill Obamacare, make them pay for resulting ER visits – Modesto Bee

Michael A. Clarke: If Republicans kill Obamacare, make them pay for resulting ER visits
Modesto Bee
Republicans persist in their efforts to eliminate Obamacare and take health insurance away from millions of Americans. If successful, those millions of uninsured folks will have to go to emergency rooms when they are sick, get cancer, or are seriously

and more »

View post:
Michael A. Clarke: If Republicans kill Obamacare, make them pay for resulting ER visits – Modesto Bee

Read More...

Centra’s Bedford Memorial Hospital to open temporary emergency department ahead of expansion project – Lynchburg News and Advance

BEDFORD A $4 million expansion project that will increase the size of the Bedford Memorial Hospital emergency department by more than 30 percent will begin in June.

But before work gets underway, the hospital will open a temporary emergency department on the second floor starting May 18.

Bedford Memorial Hospital CEO Patti Jurkus said the newly renovated and expanded emergency department is planned to open in March 2018.

Jurkus and Stacey Hopkins, nursing director for the emergency department, held an information session Wednesday night at the Central Virginia Community College Bedford campus to inform the public of the upcoming change.

We are very excited about the opportunity to expand the emergency department, Jurkus said. We want the community to have easy access to the emergency department during this renovation.

While renovations are taking place, the emergency department will move to the second floor and use the entrance from the administrative parking lot located on Whitfield Drive.

The current emergency room is located on the opposite side of the hospital, past the entrance on Oakwood Street.

There will be a barrier constructed in the current parking lot on Whitfield Drive that will separate the EMS drop-off and walk-in patients.

The current main entrance of the hospital, meanwhile, will be used for outpatient visits only.

James Rose, director of facility services, said the new department will expand by 1,800 square feet, to about 7,500 square feet in size.

Hopkins said there has been an 11 percent increase in the number of emergency room patients during the past two years.

Expanding the emergency department marks Centras latest investment in the hospital. Centra and Carilion Clinic had run the hospital as part of a 50-50 partnership since 2001. Centra paid Carilion about $12 million and assumed ownership July 1, 2014.

That same year, officials said Centra would expand and update the hospitals emergency room, and Centra publicly committed to making an estimated $11 million to $12 million in capital investments in the hospital during the next five years, including infrastructural upgrades, advanced medical equipment and improvements to Oakwood Manor, the 111-bed health and rehabilitation center attached to the hospital. In May 2016, Centra announced it would reopen Bedford Hospice House.

Planning for the temporary emergency department has been ongoing, and Jurkus said she is thankful for the help of multiple community members who have offered support. The hospital has met with the sheriff, town police, neighbors, mental health workers and EMS officials to create the plan for the temporary department.

Additional staff of three nurses and 10 to 12 certified nurses assistants will be hired as well as a new switchboard operation of three full-time and two to four part-time workers that will be staffed 24/7, Hopkins said.

We love our hospital, love our community and want to provide best service possible, Jurkus said. We want the community to be informed, and we want to continue to provide our services.

Read more:
Centra’s Bedford Memorial Hospital to open temporary emergency department ahead of expansion project – Lynchburg News and Advance

Read More...

Emergency Room entrance closed at Sentara Woodbridge – Fauquier Times

Heads up for future trips to the emergency room at Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center in Woodbridge.

The hospitals emergency department is undergoing renovations, which will require the emergency-room entrance to be closed until the end of June, according to a hospital press release.

Patients arriving for emergency services at Sentara Northern Virginia Medical Center will have to use the hospitals main entrance beginning today, Tuesday, April 18.

The hospital will offer free valet parking services seven days a week, from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m., during the construction to ease patients arrival, the press release said.

The emergency department will remain open during the redesign and renovations. The project will take place from April 2017 to the end of the year. The emergency-room entrance, however, is expected to be affected only until the end of June, the press release said.

More here:
Emergency Room entrance closed at Sentara Woodbridge – Fauquier Times

Read More...

Police-Related Injuries Send 50000 People to ER Yearly – Live Science

An estimated 51,000 people in the United States go to the emergency room each year for injuries they sustain during encounters with law enforcement, a new study suggests. The vast majority of those injuries are minor.

The researchers found that over the seven-year period from 2006 to 2012, there were about 356,000 visits to hospital emergency rooms for law-enforcement-related injuries throughout the country. Of these cases, about 1,200 people died (0.3 percent of the total), either when they were in the emergency room or after they were admitted to the hospital, according to the findings, published today (April 19) in the journal JAMA Surgery.

The study suggests that nonfatal injuries are much more pervasive than law-enforcement-associated deaths, said lead study author Dr. Elinore Kaufman, a surgical resident at New York-Presbyterian Hospital Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City. [6 Politicians Who Got the Science Wrong]

The new study comes after a series of high-profile deaths of civilians following contact with police officers. These deaths have brought increased media attention to the issue of police-involved deaths and have led to more questions from the public about the number of such fatalities that occur in the country each year.

But so far, data on the deaths and injuries from these interactions has been incomplete, the study authors wrote.

To find out more about these law-enforcement-related injuries and deaths, the researchers analyzed data from a government database called the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample, which includes a nationally representative sample of emergency room visits in the U.S. They looked at injuries that were known to be caused by an interaction with law enforcement and were coded that way in the database.

The analysis showed that the number of hospital emergency room visits for law-enforcement-related injuries was stable between 2006 and 2012; it did not increase over time.

The most common cause of injuries was “being struck by or against,” which was responsible for 77 percent of the visits to emergency rooms in this category.

This could mean that people were struck by a hand, foot or object, or that they were struck against a wall, car or the ground, Kaufman told Live Science. She noted that the data used in the analysis relies on the numerical codes that hospitals use for billing purposes, and does not provide all of the details people might like to know about each injury.

Gunshot or stab wounds accounted for about 7 percent of all law-enforcement-linked injuries, according to the findings.

The researchers also found that emergency room visits linked with law enforcement were more common in the South and the West, with each of these regions accounting for about one-third of all visits. Together, the Northeast and Midwest accounted for the remaining third. [Understanding the 10 Most Destructive Human Behaviors]

Most of the injured patients were young men: More than 80 percent were male, and the average age of the injured person was 32, the researchers found. Mental illness was common, affecting 20 percent of cases, Kaufman said.

She noted that the study’s estimate of 51,000 emergency room visits per year does not include deaths that occur at crime scenes or people who are injured but do not seek medical attention.

Another limitation of the study is that the database that the researchers used did not include information on patients’ race or ethnicity, nor did it provide additional details on geographic location beyond regional information. These were two important components of recent headline-making cases involving police-related injuries and deaths, so more research is needed to incorporate those elements, Kaufman said.

“There is a lot more to learn about the factors that can contribute to or mitigate these injuries,” Kaufman said.

Originally published on Live Science.

Read the original post:
Police-Related Injuries Send 50000 People to ER Yearly – Live Science

Read More...

Page 20«..10..19202122..3040..»