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The Villages Regional Hospital Emergency Room – Villages-News

To the Editor:

We are relatively new to the Villages and have had to make a few trips to the Villages hospital.The hospital is beautiful and well run, and you can tell that there is a lot of pride that goes into the building, the volunteers, and the staff. The reason that I am writing this letter is because, for the first time, I had to go to the emergency room at the hospital.Even though I had read about negative experiences others had encountered while using the Villages hospital emergency room, I still didnt think it could be that bad.Unfortunately, I was sadly mistaken.The emergency room was understaffed and simply not capable of servicing the needs of the people who came there. While sitting in the waiting room for hours with a blood clot I was amazed at how many others, who were also in need of immediate care, had been waiting. One man came into the waiting room stating that his wife was sitting in the parking lot in the ambulance because they had no beds for her in the emergency room.The staff member in the emergency room, who was clearly overwhelmed, said that the wait time could be up to 20 hours. Some people left to try to find other hospitals and some stayed and hoped for the best. I just found it hard to believe that this was happening. Our short time living in The Villages we had become so accustomed to everything in the Villages being top notch, that this was just so unexpected. I think the higher level administrators need to take a hard look at what is happening.They should strive for having the best emergency room services possible (like the Villages tries to provide in all other aspects of living here), or maybe not have an emergency room at all. Their current situation is just giving the entire hospital a bad reputation.

Pete JacksonSan Pedro Villas

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The Villages Regional Hospital Emergency Room – Villages-News

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New emergency room among big changes at Rapid City hospital – Huron Daily Tribune

Updated 10:21am, Saturday, August 26, 2017

RAPID CITY, S.D. (AP) A $200 million transformation of Rapid City Regional Hospital has begun with the completion of a three-level parking garage.

The Rapid City Journal reports the most profound upcoming changes include the move of the hospital’s main entrance from the north side to the south side of the building; integration of inpatient and outpatient cardiac care services; expansion of the emergency department and the addition of another parking garage.

“Two years from now what we’re going to see is something completely different, better access for patients and better access for all of our clinical teams,” Paulette Davidson, the hospital’s chief operating officer, said at a Tuesday gathering inside a recently completed 754-space parking facility just south of the main hospital complex. “And this is just the beginning.”

The new, three-story front entrance will be made with glass, and the 36,000-square-foot emergency department will have more patient beds and medical offices.

The new emergency department will be 150 percent larger than the current space, which is already the busiest in the state with 85,000 visits per year. It’ll include five trauma exam rooms, more than 30 private exam rooms, enclosed parking for six ambulances and elevator access to a rooftop helipad.

A 30,000-square-foot intermediate care cardiac unit with outpatient offices of the Heart and Vascular Institute will be located on the level above the new emergency department.

“It’s going to be a fantastic change and will continue to advance the level of cardiac care that people have become accustomed to,” said Joseph Tuma, a cardiologist.

The project is slated for completion in 2020.

___

Information from: Rapid City Journal, http://www.rapidcityjournal.com

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New emergency room among big changes at Rapid City hospital – Huron Daily Tribune

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Serious Nursing Home Abuse Often Not Reported To Police, Federal Investigators Find – NPR

More than one-quarter of the 134 cases of severe abuse that were uncovered by government investigators were not reported to the police. The vast majority of the cases involved sexual assault. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

More than one-quarter of the 134 cases of severe abuse that were uncovered by government investigators were not reported to the police. The vast majority of the cases involved sexual assault.

More than one-quarter of serious cases of nursing home abuse are not reported to the police, according to an alert released Monday morning by the Office of Inspector General in the Department of Health and Human Services.

The cases went unreported despite the fact that state and federal law require that serious cases of abuse in nursing homes be turned over to the police.

Government investigators are conducting an ongoing review into nursing home abuse and neglect but say they are releasing the alert now because they want immediate fixes.

These are cases of abuse severe enough to send someone to the emergency room. One example cited in the alert is a woman who was left deeply bruised after being sexually assaulted at her nursing home. Federal law says that incident should have been reported to the police within two hours. But the nursing home didn’t do that, says Curtis Roy, an assistant regional inspector general in the Department of Health and Human Services.

“They cleaned off the victim,” he says. “In doing so, they destroyed all of the evidence that law enforcement could have used as part of an investigation into this crime.”

The nursing home told the victim’s family about the assault the next day. It was the family that informed the police. But Roy says that even then, the nursing home tried to cover up the crime.

“They went so far as to contact the local police department to tell them that they did not need to come out to facility to conduct an investigation,” says Roy.

Looking at records from 2015 and 2016, Curtis Roy and his team of investigators found 134 cases of abuse of nursing home residents severe enough to require emergency treatment. The vast majority of the cases involved sexual assault.

There’s never an excuse to allow somebody to suffer this kind of torment.

Curtis Roy

“There’s never an excuse to allow somebody to suffer this kind of torment, really, ever,” says Roy.

The incidents of abuse were spread across 33 states. Illinois had the most at 17. Seventy-two percent of all the cases appear to have been reported to local law enforcement within two hours. But twenty-eight percent were not. Investigators from the Office of the Inspector General decided to report all 134 cases to the police. “We’re so concerned,” says Roy, “we’d rather over-report something than not have it reported at all.”

The alert from the Inspector General’s office says that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), which regulate nursing homes, need to do more to track these cases of abuse. The alert suggests that the agency should do what Curtis Roy’s investigators did: cross-reference Medicare claims from nursing home residents with their claims from the emergency room. Investigators were able to see if an individual on Medicare filed claims for both nursing home care and emergency room services. Investigators could then see if the emergency room diagnosis indicated the patient was a victim of a crime, such as physical or sexual assault.

The alert notes that federal law on this issue was strengthened in 2011. It requires someone who suspects abuse of a nursing home resident causing serious bodily injury, to report their suspicion to local law enforcement in two hours or less. If their suspicion of abuse does not involve serious bodily injury of the nursing home resident, they have 24 hours to report it. Failure to do so can result in fines of up to $300,000.

But CMS never got explicit authority from the Secretary of Health and Human Services to enforce the penalties. According to the Inspector General’s alert, CMS only began seeking that authority this year. CMS did not make anyone available for an interview.

Clearly, the 134 cases of severe abuse uncovered by the Inspector General’s office represent a tiny fraction of the nation’s 1.4 million nursing home residents. But Curtis Roy says the cases they found are likely just a small fraction of the ones that exist, since they were only able to identify victims of abuse who were taken to an emergency room. “It’s the worst of the worst,” he says. “I don’t believe that anyone thinks this is acceptable.

“We’ve got to do a better job,” says Roy, of “getting [abuse] out of our health care system.”

One thing investigators don’t yet know is whether the nursing homes where abuses took place were ever fined or punished in any way. That will be part of the Inspector General’s full report which is expected in about a year.

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Serious Nursing Home Abuse Often Not Reported To Police, Federal Investigators Find – NPR

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New emergency room among big changes at Rapid City hospital – News & Observer

A $200 million transformation of Rapid City Regional Hospital has begun with the completion of a three-level parking garage.

The Rapid City Journal reports the most profound upcoming changes include the move of the hospital’s main entrance from the north side to the south side of the building; integration of inpatient and outpatient cardiac care services; expansion of the emergency department and the addition of another parking garage.

“Two years from now what we’re going to see is something completely different, better access for patients and better access for all of our clinical teams,” Paulette Davidson, the hospital’s chief operating officer, said at a Tuesday gathering inside a recently completed 754-space parking facility just south of the main hospital complex. “And this is just the beginning.”

The new, three-story front entrance will be made with glass, and the 36,000-square-foot emergency department will have more patient beds and medical offices.

The new emergency department will be 150 percent larger than the current space, which is already the busiest in the state with 85,000 visits per year. It’ll include five trauma exam rooms, more than 30 private exam rooms, enclosed parking for six ambulances and elevator access to a rooftop helipad.

A 30,000-square-foot intermediate care cardiac unit with outpatient offices of the Heart and Vascular Institute will be located on the level above the new emergency department.

“It’s going to be a fantastic change and will continue to advance the level of cardiac care that people have become accustomed to,” said Joseph Tuma, a cardiologist.

The project is slated for completion in 2020.

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New emergency room among big changes at Rapid City hospital – News & Observer

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Emergency room visit links man to homicide – WSMV Channel 4 – WSMV Nashville

Updated: Saturday, August 26 2017 10:23 PM EDT2017-08-27 02:23:48 GMT

The Volunteer State always comes together in times of crisis. Red Cross volunteers are mobilizing for the trip to Texas and Louisiana. Right now, they are on standby, ready to deploy over next several days and weeks.

The Volunteer State always comes together in times of crisis. Red Cross volunteers are mobilizing for the trip to Texas and Louisiana. Right now, they are on standby, ready to deploy over next several days and weeks.

Updated: Saturday, August 26 2017 5:19 PM EDT2017-08-26 21:19:14 GMT

A pizza delivery driver has passed away todayafter being shot in north Nashville on August 25.

A pizza delivery driver has passed away todayafter being shot in north Nashville on August 25.

Updated: Saturday, August 26 2017 11:29 AM EDT2017-08-26 15:29:56 GMT

Representative Steve Cohen (D-Tenn.) made headlines when he publicly supported the impeachment of Donald Trump following the president’s controversial remarks in the wake of the violent rally in Charlottesville, Va. Saturday morning, Cohen has once again spoken out against Trump, this time criticizing the president’s decision to pardon for former Maricopa County (Arizona) Sheriff Joe Arpaio.

Representative Steve Cohen (D-Tenn.) made headlines when he publicly supported the impeachment of Donald Trump following the president’s controversial remarks in the wake of the violent rally in Charlottesville, Va. Saturday morning, Cohen has once again spoken out against Trump, this time criticizing the president’s decision to pardon for former Maricopa County (Arizona) Sheriff Joe Arpaio.

Updated: Saturday, August 26 2017 9:07 AM EDT2017-08-26 13:07:53 GMT

Around 10:00 pm Friday, Clarksville Police responded to a shooting in progress at an apartment complex at the 3100 block of Ft Campbell Blvd. When the officers entered the apartment, they found a man killed from a gunshot wound. Nobody else was inside the apartment. Shortly after, the officers were notified that a man in his 20s was being treated at the emergency for a gunshot wound to his lower arm.

Around 10:00 pm Friday, Clarksville Police responded to a shooting in progress at an apartment complex at the 3100 block of Ft Campbell Blvd. When the officers entered the apartment, they found a man killed from a gunshot wound. Nobody else was inside the apartment. Shortly after, the officers were notified that a man in his 20s was being treated at the emergency for a gunshot wound to his lower arm.

Updated: Saturday, August 26 2017 8:49 AM EDT2017-08-26 12:49:33 GMT

Around 3:15 Saturday morning, police responded to a shooting at the intersection of 19th Ave S and Chet Atkins Place. A security guard called in the incident. Witnesses told police that they saw two white females exit a new-looking Lexus SUV and fire two shots at a man sleeping in front of one of the buildings at the intersection.

Around 3:15 Saturday morning, police responded to a shooting at the intersection of 19th Ave S and Chet Atkins Place. A security guard called in the incident. Witnesses told police that they saw two white females exit a new-looking Lexus SUV and fire two shots at a man sleeping in front of one of the buildings at the intersection.

Updated: Friday, August 25 2017 11:48 PM EDT2017-08-26 03:48:00 GMT

A CSX worker lost his arm when he was hit by a train during Mondays total solar eclipse. It happened at the rail yard off Sidco Drive around 1:30 p.m.

A CSX worker lost his arm when he was hit by a train during Mondays total solar eclipse. It happened at the rail yard off Sidco Drive around 1:30 p.m.

Updated: Friday, August 25 2017 11:44 PM EDT2017-08-26 03:44:22 GMT

A Middle Tennessee man is about to let go of what he and experts believe is the best picture of Jesse James anywhere.

A Middle Tennessee man is about to let go of what he and experts believe is the best picture of Jesse James anywhere.

Updated: Friday, August 25 2017 9:41 PM EDT2017-08-26 01:41:46 GMT

Frustration and anger best describes the emotion from builders and residents in a growing Nashville neighborhood.

Frustration and anger best describes the emotion from builders and residents in a growing Nashville neighborhood.

Updated: Friday, August 25 2017 9:11 PM EDT2017-08-26 01:11:16 GMT

President Donald Trump is reacting to Sen. Bob Corker’s criticism of his leadership. In a tweet Friday morning, the president blasted Corker.

President Donald Trump is reacting to Sen. Bob Corker’s criticism of his leadership. In a tweet Friday morning, the president blasted Corker.

Updated: Friday, August 25 2017 8:32 PM EDT2017-08-26 00:32:25 GMT

At least two people have been injured in a shooting in Murfreesboro Friday evening.

At least two people have been injured in a shooting in Murfreesboro Friday evening.

Updated: Thursday, August 24 2017 9:19 PM EDT2017-08-25 01:19:41 GMT

“Duck Dynasty” star Korie Robertson thinks President Donald Trump needs to make a change — and said she’s hopeful that he can.

“Duck Dynasty” star Korie Robertson thinks President Donald Trump needs to make a change — and said she’s hopeful that he can.

Updated: Friday, August 25 2017 9:41 PM EDT2017-08-26 01:41:46 GMT

Frustration and anger best describes the emotion from builders and residents in a growing Nashville neighborhood.

Frustration and anger best describes the emotion from builders and residents in a growing Nashville neighborhood.

Updated: Thursday, August 24 2017 11:48 AM EDT2017-08-24 15:48:59 GMT

Lets face it. Weve all dreamed about what we would do if we won the lottery. But be glad you didn’t win.

Lets face it. Weve all dreamed about what we would do if we won the lottery. But be glad you didn’t win.

Updated: Friday, August 25 2017 11:44 PM EDT2017-08-26 03:44:22 GMT

A Middle Tennessee man is about to let go of what he and experts believe is the best picture of Jesse James anywhere.

A Middle Tennessee man is about to let go of what he and experts believe is the best picture of Jesse James anywhere.

Updated: Friday, August 25 2017 11:48 PM EDT2017-08-26 03:48:00 GMT

A CSX worker lost his arm when he was hit by a train during Mondays total solar eclipse. It happened at the rail yard off Sidco Drive around 1:30 p.m.

A CSX worker lost his arm when he was hit by a train during Mondays total solar eclipse. It happened at the rail yard off Sidco Drive around 1:30 p.m.

Updated: Saturday, August 26 2017 5:19 PM EDT2017-08-26 21:19:14 GMT

A pizza delivery driver has passed away todayafter being shot in north Nashville on August 25.

A pizza delivery driver has passed away todayafter being shot in north Nashville on August 25.

Updated: Thursday, August 24 2017 10:48 PM EDT2017-08-25 02:48:13 GMT

A second lawsuit has been filed against the rape suspects and the parents in an alleged rape cover-up at Brentwood Academy.

A second lawsuit has been filed against the rape suspects and the parents in an alleged rape cover-up at Brentwood Academy.

Updated: Thursday, August 24 2017 6:36 PM EDT2017-08-24 22:36:09 GMT

A Nashville activist and Antifa member is speaking out about his experience at the Charlottesville, VA, rally earlier this month.

A Nashville activist and Antifa member is speaking out about his experience at the Charlottesville, VA, rally earlier this month.

Updated: Saturday, August 26 2017 8:49 AM EDT2017-08-26 12:49:33 GMT

Around 3:15 Saturday morning, police responded to a shooting at the intersection of 19th Ave S and Chet Atkins Place. A security guard called in the incident. Witnesses told police that they saw two white females exit a new-looking Lexus SUV and fire two shots at a man sleeping in front of one of the buildings at the intersection.

Around 3:15 Saturday morning, police responded to a shooting at the intersection of 19th Ave S and Chet Atkins Place. A security guard called in the incident. Witnesses told police that they saw two white females exit a new-looking Lexus SUV and fire two shots at a man sleeping in front of one of the buildings at the intersection.

Updated: Saturday, August 26 2017 9:07 AM EDT2017-08-26 13:07:53 GMT

Around 10:00 pm Friday, Clarksville Police responded to a shooting in progress at an apartment complex at the 3100 block of Ft Campbell Blvd. When the officers entered the apartment, they found a man killed from a gunshot wound. Nobody else was inside the apartment. Shortly after, the officers were notified that a man in his 20s was being treated at the emergency for a gunshot wound to his lower arm.

Around 10:00 pm Friday, Clarksville Police responded to a shooting in progress at an apartment complex at the 3100 block of Ft Campbell Blvd. When the officers entered the apartment, they found a man killed from a gunshot wound. Nobody else was inside the apartment. Shortly after, the officers were notified that a man in his 20s was being treated at the emergency for a gunshot wound to his lower arm.

“+r+”

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Emergency room visit links man to homicide – WSMV Channel 4 – WSMV Nashville

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A View of the Epidemic: At the ER, New Complexities – Valley News

Lebanon Its hard to imagine someone more directly involved in the opioid epidemic through his work than Thomas Trimarco. Hes an emergency medicine physician at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, where hes worked since 2012.

Emergency rooms, of course, in some ways serve as one of the front lines in dealing with fallout from the epidemic. Its where opioid users are taken when theyve overdosed. Its also a place where users might go to feign a condition in the hope of securing narcotics.

Dartmouth-Hitchcock officials couldnt readily produce statistics on the number of opioid-related cases it handles in the emergency room, but Trimarco, 37, has no doubt it has increased substantially in the number of people he sees with serious, chronic conditions resulting from intravenous drug use, such as infections of the spine, heart and brain.

Those can lead to significant problems that cant necessarily be taken care of at the smaller, community hospitals, said Trimarco, who also serves as medical director for 27 local emergency medical service agencies. So, weve seen a significant increase in the amount of patients who are being transferred from (other) hospitals that are ending up in our emergency department and in our facility with these more serious, long-term complications.

Such cases were once relatively uncommon, but the amount that were seeing now is very significant. Instead of kind of an interesting, once-in-a-while case, its a pretty common case these days.

While some patients come to the emergency room seeking drugs to feed their habit, Trimarco said DHMC has not seen an increase in such patients recently.

I dont think were known as a candy shop, he said.

Because drug seekers often come in complaining of pain-related conditions, such as those that are commonly treated with opioids, it can sometimes be difficult for providers to determine whether a patient is seeking drugs to feed a habit or is in need of medication to treat an acute medical need, he said.

We like to think the best of patients and surely we will give them the benefit of the doubt, Trimarco said.

His job though is to evaluate a patient to determine what their medical need might be.

Once weve eliminated the acute medical issue that might be going on other than the substance abuse … We try to be upfront and honest about our ability to prescribe (opioids) for chronic pain issues out of the emergency department, he said.

There are times when Trimarco has to speak firmly and bluntly with patients who just want to feed their habit.

Most of the time the overall interaction is reasonable and goes well, he said. But, patients can get upset and angry when they are looking for what they think they need or deserve in coming into the emergency room.

In some cases, patients may become violent, Trimarco said.

Trimarco was assaulted twice while working in an emergency room in Cincinnati, prior to coming to DHMC. In one instance, he was punched in the face, in the other he suffered a broken rib. Though both assaults predated the opioid epidemic, they did involve substance use, he said.

Violence against health-care providers is a problem throughout this system and the nation, he said. Its certainly complicated and, perhaps, increased by the opioid epidemic that were seeing. We are seeing more instances of risk to providers both in the ED as well as in the hospital over the last couple of years.

Health care providers face another danger as a result of the epidemic: toxic substances. Even a trace amount of fentanyl or carfentinal narcotics frequently used by addicts could cause a fatal overdose. Such substances may lurk on patients clothing or belongings when they arrive in the emergency room or when emergency medical personnel arrive on a scene, Trimarco said.

No longer can we just kind of dive in and start treating that patient, he said.

If providers suspect patients may have toxic substances on them, they may need to remove and bag their clothing, or take a shower, Trimarco said.

He and the emergency room staff have to deal with overdoses and medical conditions related to intravenous drug use, but the epidemic has also forced him to question whether the standard emergency-room approach is adequate to the task.

As emergency physicians, were really trained to diagnose and to stabilize the acute medical problem thats in front of us, and once that stabilization is achieved were able to hopefully pass that patient along to another provider that would specialize in the longer term care of whatever the ailment, injury or illness is, Trimarco said.

What weve recognized, though, is the exposure that we have to a patient in the emergency department is sometimes the only chance that the health care system has to access these patients and to offer them this support that they may be in need of.

Aiming to break the cycle of addiction, emergency-room staff have started a peer-recovery coaching program.

We will identify patients who may benefit from this program and well call in a recovery coach to spend some time with that patient and offer some support to that patient, both for their current emergency department visit as well as, hopefully, going forward as they try to deal with the long-term addiction that theyre struggling with, he said.

Shifting to addressing patients longer-term needs, however, has come at a cost. What might previously have been a one- or two-hour visit can sometimes last much longer, which can mean longer waits for other patients, he said.

It does have significant downstream effects for all of the other patients in the community who are coming in for emergency care, but these patients are as important as all of our other patients and we still prioritize them and all of our patients according to severity, said Trimarco.

Providers approach those struggling with substance abuse differently than they did in the past, Trimarco said.

I think we all do a little bit of a better job of recognizing the significant struggle that our patients are having dealing with substance abuse these days, he said. I think the patients are less stigmatized than they have been in the past, perhaps.

In some cases, health-care providers also struggle with substance abuse.

Before coming to D-H, I worked at a hospital and we had a young, tremendously talented nurse in our emergency department that died of an overdose, and so I dont think anybody is immune to this epidemic, he said. You see it in many different ways, both when youre working clinically and … it certainly spills over to our personal side as well.

Its a privilege to be able to see and treat patients in some of the worst times of their (lives), but at the same time that can take a toll on you and you certainly need to find a way to appropriately and positively deal with those stresses to be able to continue to do your job and serve the patients that we try to serve, Trimarco said.

Sometimes you just need a little bit of a breather, he said. A lot of times the issues that we see just constantly remind us of the blessings and the amazing things in our own lives.

Staff Writer Nora Doyle-Burr can be reached at ndoyleburr@vnews.com or 603-727-3213.

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A View of the Epidemic: At the ER, New Complexities – Valley News

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Utah’s ER Nurse of the Year’s 38 years of service an anomaly – Deseret News

Utah Valley Hospital

Jean Lundquist working at the ER of Utah Valley Hospital earlier in her career.

PROVO They say home is where the heart is. For Jean Lundquist, her heart lies in the emergency room.

“I was in the hospital when I was probably 7 or 8 years old,” said Lundquist, an ER nurse at Utah Valley Hospital. “I just thought it was cool. I always wanted to do something like that. I always wanted a stethoscope, I always wanted medical stuff.”

Now, when people ask how long she’s been in this line of work, it takes a lot of thought and staring at the ceiling while trying to do math in her head. Lundquist settled on 38 years.

“When I first started, I worked up in Idaho at a small hospital and then worked on the ambulance up there,” she said. “It was awesome.”

Surviving in the realm of emergency medicine for nearly four decades makes Lundquist a bit of an anomaly. “The average burnout rate for an ER nurse is five years,” she said.

Lundquist believes that’s because the stress level is always high in an emergency room.

“You can be sitting there doing nothing, and then bam, you’ve got five people from a car wreck, and somebody with a heart attack, ” she said. “Even when there’s nothing going on, there’s the potential of something coming in.”

Even for those who become accustomed to the constant stress, there are days that stick with them.

“We see people die almost every day,” Lundquist said. “There’s been times where I’ve thought ‘I’m never doing this again.’

“One of the big days was, we had a little 18-month-old that had been run over by a car, and I had a daughter who was 18 months old,” she added. “I went over to day care and just laid by her and just bawled.”

Keeping the job from affecting personal life can be a monumental task, especially when you can’t help but feel attached to those you treat, Lundquist said.

“The people that come here, this is a horrible day in their life,” she said. “They’re either losing a loved one, or they might lose a loved one, or they themselves are really injured.”

Her hard work over the past 38 years isn’t going unrecognized. The Bureau of Emergency Services and Preparedness recently honored Lundquist with Utah’s Emergency Nurse of the Year Award.

Her fellow nurses say Lundquist’s attachment to her patients poses a challenge but also is one of the reasons she’s so deserving of the award.

“Always treating everyone, the psych patients, the homeless. You know, no matter what your place is, she just treats everyone with respect,” said Tina Dewey, a registered nurse at Utah Valley Hospital.

While Lundquist appreciates the accolade, the hope of recognition certainly isn’t what’s kept her in the emergency room for decades, while so many others switched to different departments.

“I remember all the good parts, where you helped somebody, and they come down the next week and shake your hand and tell you ‘thank you,'” she said, while also calling attention to the benefits of finding support among her colleagues. “Sitting around with friends after a shift, going over it with everybody.”

Lundquist has also found acclaim around the hospital. While she still gets called to the ER, she spends most of her time in an office as manager over the hospital’s entire trauma program.

But she doesn’t like talking much about her award or other recognition she’s received over her long career. Instead, she wants to encourage others to follow the same path she has because, despite all the heartache, there’s no other place she’d rather call home.

“Don’t give up because it’s hard,” she said. “You can do hard things. And once you find out what you’re passionate about, do it every day.”

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Utah’s ER Nurse of the Year’s 38 years of service an anomaly – Deseret News

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First Choice Emergency Room Opens New Facility in Austin, Texas – Benzinga

Celebrates Grand Opening with Donation to William B. Travis High School

Lewisville, Texas (PRWEB) August 26, 2017

First Choice Emergency Room opened its new AustinRiverside facility at 7am Friday, August 25. The new facility is located at 2020 E. Riverside Dr., Austin, TX and is open 24-7.

“We are pleased to bring another facility to the Austin community and look forward to delivering the highest quality emergency medical care here,” said Dr. Stephen van Roekel, Facility Medical Director of First Choice Emergency Room AustinRiverside.

To celebrate the opening, First Choice Emergency Room made a donation to William B. Travis High School at First Choice Emergency Room’s ribbon cutting with the Austin Chamber of Commerce. Following the ribbon cutting, First Choice Emergency Room hosted a medical community open house.

On Sunday from 11am-1pm, First Choice Emergency Room will host a community event. Majic 95.5 will be on site giving away radio station tickets, swag, and gift cards while supplies last.

First Choice Emergency Room facilities are equipped with a full radiology suite, including CT scanner, Digital X-ray, Ultrasound, as well as on-site laboratories certified by the Clinical Laboratory Improvements Amendments (CLIA) and accredited by the Commission on Office Laboratories Accreditation (COLA). The facilities are staffed exclusively with board-certified physicians and emergency trained registered nurses.

To learn more about First Choice Emergency Room and the new AustinRiverside location, please visit https://fcer.com/locations/austin-map.

About First Choice Emergency Room

First Choice Emergency Room (FCER.com) is the nation’s leading network of independent freestanding emergency rooms; it is both the largest and the oldest. First Choice Emergency Room is revolutionizing the delivery of emergency medical services for adult and pediatric emergencies by offering patients convenient, neighborhood access to emergency medical care. First Choice Emergency Room facilities are innovative, freestanding, and fully equipped emergency rooms with a complete radiology suite of diagnostic technology (CT scanner, Ultrasound, and Digital X-ray) and on-site laboratory. All First Choice Emergency Room locations are staffed with board-certified physicians and emergency trained registered nurses. First Choice Emergency Room has facilities in Austin, Houston, and San Antonio. According to patient feedback collected by Press Ganey Associates Inc., First Choice Emergency Room provides the highest quality emergency medical care and received the 2013, 2014, 2015, and 2016 Press Ganey Guardian of Excellence Award for exceeding the 95th percentile in patient satisfaction nationwide. First Choice Emergency Room is an Adeptus Health company.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/08/prweb14635780.htm

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First Choice Emergency Room Opens New Facility in Austin, Texas – Benzinga

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Prejudice in the emergency room – Yale News

by Natasha Strydhorst August 22, 2017

Esther Choo, M.D. ’01, wrote a Twitter thread that has brought national attention to racism in medicine.

Every so oftena few times a yeara patient at Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) hospital in Portland refuses treatment in the emergency department from Esther Choo, M.D. 01, M.P.H. Its not because they consider her 15 years medical practice too paltry, or her School of Medicine degree insufficientbut because she is not white.

Its one of those things that youre never prepared for, said Choo, whose parents emigrated from Korea in the 1960s. Nobody, at any point, has said, Oh, by the way: youre a woman and youre a physician of color; you probably will have experiences like this. So Choo began that conversation with a Twitter thread the Sunday after the white supremacist rally on August 12 in Charlottesville, Va., that ended in violence and with the death of Heather Heyer when a car allegedly driven by a neo-Nazi plowed into a crowd of counter-protesters. In a matter of days, the thread had been retweeted more than 25,000 times (including by Chelsea Clinton and the physician-writer Atul Gawande, M.D.) and garnered more than 2,000 comments. The attention led to Choos appearance on CNN, where she discussed the issue of racism when it comes to patient care. Those patients who refused her capable care, Choo said, either chose to be treated by a white intern over the experienced doctor or walked, untreated, out of the emergency room.

Breathtaking, isnt it? Choo tweeted, To be so wedded to your theory of white superiority, that you will bet your life on it, even in the face of clear evidence to the contrary? That evidence could hardly be clearer: in addition to her 12 years of post-residency practice, Choo has her degree from the School of Medicine, her residency at Boston Medical Center, and work as an associate professor and attending physician at Brown University under her belt. Shes now an associate professor at OHSU, where, in addition to her clinical duties, she studies health disparities, substance abuse disorders, and gender bias. She also writes and serves on the advisory board for FeminEM, a resource for women working in emergency medicine.

Her familys story is a classic immigrant tale. Her parents came to the United States so her father could study engineering at Michigan State University. After receiving his doctorate, he went to work as an aerospace engineer for NASA in Cleveland, while her mother owned a home cleaning service. They became citizens and raised three childrenEsthers two brothers are a biology teacher and a management consultant. Before coming to the school of medicine, Choo graduated from Yale College with a degree in English language and literature.

It took me a long time to get to where I am now, where I dont internalize it at all, Choo said of her efforts to deal with racism at work. But when youre a younger physician and youre still developing your knowledge base, there are so many doubts that you have. So when you encounter someone who looks at you and finds something wrong thats so personal to youthat cannot be separated from youit just creeps into any available areas of insecurity. And somehow you walk away feeling less confident as a physician, because this person is questioning your legitimacy to be there.

It’s one of those things you’re never prepared for.

Choos experience is not unique. Many of the thousands of replies to her thread related similar experiences, an outpouring that raises concerns. An article last year in the New England Journal of Medicine discussed how physicians might deal with racist patients, and in December OHSU released what Choo called a prescient statement advising patients that hate speech and bigotry will not be toleratedand that requests for a specific physician based solely on race will not be honored.

How do we improve the multiculturalism and the diversity of our physician workforce? Choo said. Its really hard if youre presenting some subsets of the physician work force with a harder road to travel.

Nancy R. Angoff, M.P.H. 81 M.D. 90, HS 93, associate dean for student affairs, who recalled seeing the qualities of compassionate care and calm leadership in Choo as a medical student, noted that the issue is a pressing one. More and more, were looking at that as a form of mistreatment that our medical students face, that our trainees face, that we as an institution need to take seriously, she said. We need to foster an environment in which we respect each other.

Hospitals are not selective institutionswe treat everybody who walks in the door, Choo said. We are really thrown togetherpretty intimatelywith our patients, so were going to encounter a wide variety of opinions, and some of them will be extreme intolerance. Its one thing to view it from across the country or on TV, and its another thing to have it in your workplace and up in your face.

Some refuse to believe that Choos experience is genuine. To the doubters, Choo is gracious: Its a hard reality to acceptit shows the darker side of human nature, she said. Injecting a positive note into that darker reality, Choo revealed in her Twitter thread what gives her hope: A few get uncomfortable and apologize in the same breath they refuse to let me treat them, she wrote. You see, its a hell of a hard thing to maintain that level of hate face to face.

This article was submitted by John Dent Curtis on August 22, 2017.

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Prejudice in the emergency room – Yale News

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Bethesda mistakenly bills woman $1000 after ER waiting room visit – WCPO

Judy Burton said was feeling some pains on a recent Saturday night.

So the Liberty Township, Ohio woman rushed to the emergency room at the new Bethesda Butler Hospital just outside Hamilton.

“I signed in at the receptionist’s desk, and she put a little hospital band on my wrist, and told me to go to the waiting room,” Burton said.

Forty-five minutes and a few magazines later, she said her pain subsided.

“And I said ‘I’m not going to sit here,’ because I had no idea how much longer I would have to wait to see a nurse,” she said.

So she went home.

Quick visit, huge bill

But a couple of weeks later she was hit by a different kind of pain. This was in the form of a hospital bill for $1,059.

“For sitting in their chair in the waiting room, and I never saw anybody,” Burton said.

At first, she didn’t think much of it, figuring it was just a simple clerical error. She suspected Bethesdabilled her for a full emergency room visit, not realizing she had left.

But when she called, Burton said the hospital would not drop the charges. She said they would only offer a payment plan.

“She told me ‘we can give you financial assistance.’ And I said ‘I’m not paying it. I never saw a nurse or a doctor, no vitals were taken. I just sat in your chair,'” Burton said.

Then she said it got even worse.

“The woman said you will be turned over to collections,” Burton said. “And I thought ‘oh my gosh!'”

ER billing surprises common

Pat Palmer, a nationally known patient advocate with Billadvocates.com,said emergency room surprises are common everywhere.

“We are paying extreme costs that are not necessary,” she said.

Palmer said she commonly sees itemized bills for things ranging from $11 tissues to $50 latex gloves, which can send a simple visit for a stomach ache soaring well into the hundreds of dollars. From the moment you check in, and they put a wrist band on you, costs can start accruing.

Palmer said if you feel you were overcharged during an ER visit:

Some good news

After WCPOcontacted TriHealth, which runs Bethesda Butler Hospital, spokesman Joe Kelly said Burton’s situation was all a big error.

It turns out, she should not have been billed $1,000 to sit in the waiting room, Kelly said.

“We inadvertently did not remove her visit from our tracking system when she left, and a bill was processed when it should not have been,” he said. “We have taken steps to ensure this situation does not happen again.” (Please see below for his complete statement).

TriHealthremoved the entire charge, he said. Burton said the hospital also sent her flowers to apologize.

Lesson learned

There’s a lesson here for everyone who ever gets a hospital or doctor bill that looks wrong. Don’t simply pay it, and assume you’ll mention it to the office staff next time you visit.

Demand they itemize the charges, let them know you are disputing it and then carefully detail the mistakes in writing. That way, you don’t waste your money.

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Full statement from TriHealth

“The patient registered for medical care at a TriHealth facility but ultimately chose not to receive care.

We inadvertently did not remove her visit from our tracking system when she left and a bill was processed when it should not have been. We have taken steps to ensure this situation does not happen again.

When we learned of the error, we immediately reached out to the patient by phone and certified mail to extend a formal apology. We also removed the charge from her account and cancelled the claim with her insurance company.

In addition, we conducted a review to determine how the mistake was made so that it would not happen again. We value all of our customers and strive to provide the highest quality, most accurate billing service possible. We apologize for our mistake.

We encourage every patient and customer who has any questions regarding billing to call our customer service number immediately so we can resolve the issue as quickly as possible.”

Joe Kelly, TriHealth Spokesman

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Bethesda mistakenly bills woman $1000 after ER waiting room visit – WCPO

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