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EMTs bring the emergency room to the patient – EMS1.com

EMTs, ambulance crews trained to respond quickly to medical emergencies, trauma situations and accidents, are a critical but often overshadowed component of public safety

By Susan Spencer Telegram & Gazette, Worcester, Mass.

WORCESTER They’ve pulled injured people out of burning buildings, performed ice rescues, delivered babies while on the road, started IVs and intubations in the back of a truck, and revived far too many people who have overdosed on opioids with their ever-present supply of Narcan.

Emergency medical technicians, ambulance crews trained to respond quickly to medical emergencies, trauma situations and accidents, are a critical but often overshadowed component of public safety.

They’ll be found working in what one EMT called “a well-choreographed dance” with firefighters and police officers anytime a 911 call comes in. But often the role of emergency medical services as health care providers gets lost from public view in the tidy news summary that a patient was rushed to the hospital.

May 21-27 is the 43rd annual National EMS Week, in which the National Association of EMTs, in partnership with the American College of Emergency Physicians, seeks to recognize the vital contribution of EMTs to community health and safety.

A Telegram & Gazette reporter and photographer rode along with Worcester Emergency Medical Services paramedics this week, getting a view from the road of calamities large and small. On these days, it was mainly the everyday stuff of age, illness and disability — perhaps not dramatic, but the conditions and events that ultimately take their toll on most people.

Worcester EMS is a clinical department of UMass Memorial Medical Center. With approximately 90 paramedics, EMTs who have the highest level of training, Worcester EMS contracts with Worcester and Shrewsbury to provide around-the-clock coverage.

Seven ambulances drive all day in Worcester and four handle the nights. Shrewsbury has one ambulance assigned during the day and one at night, but Worcester will cover for Shrewsbury if needed.

In addition to the ambulances, supervisors, who are also paramedics, ride the streets in two Chevrolet Tahoes or a Suburban, outfitted with communications equipment and medical supply bags, to direct emergency response, coordinate with police and fire departments, or provide backup.

Serious situations or not, Worcester EMS gets 40,000 calls per year between the two communities, averaging 90 to 115 a day, according to Capt. Mark Wilson, one of four captains in charge of the department.

Capt. Wilson has worked with EMS since 1980 when it was operated out of Worcester City Hospital. It moved in 1991 to what was then UMass Medical Center.

“The whole city has changed. Every intersection is different from when I started,” he said.

What used to be eight hospitals receiving emergency patients is now three. The population has increased too, as has the proportion of people who call EMS.

Capt. Wilson said, “People are using the emergency system more as primary care. It’s a lot more busy.”

Emergency 911 calls go to the Worcester Emergency Communications Center, which dispatches to the appropriate agency — fire, police or EMS. Most calls now come in by cellphone, however, and those first get routed to Massachusetts State Police in Weston and then to the local community.

Worcester Regional Transit Authority buses can also radio EMS.

According to Capt. Wilson, the EMS system is moving in the next year to have cellphone calls go to the closest EMS department. Text messages and FaceTime video calls are also on the horizon.

“You can get 15 calls in 45 minutes,” Capt. Wilson said. And although some people call an ambulance so they don’t have to pay for a cab to the hospital, “We’re required to respond, by the commonwealth. We cannot make that judgment over the phone.”

The high volume and variety of calls Worcester EMS handles have made it one of the most active departments in the state and a place where even paramedics from Boston come to sharpen their skills.

Christian Grant, 25, is one of those who started his career with Worcester EMS, then got a full-time job with Boston MedFlight air ambulance. But he still works 30 to 40 hours a week as a per diem paramedic in Worcester.

Waiting for a call at the former Providence Street fire station, one of three ambulance hubs in the city, he said, “One of the bigger things here is you deal with everything. You are on all the calls.”

Violence, drugs, Mr. Grant has worked on it. “This is a very addicting place to work,” he said.

Worcester EMS crews are stationed at garages at 23 Wells St. and UMass Memorial’s University Campus on Lake Avenue, in addition to Providence Street, to get to calls throughout the city as quickly as possible. In Shrewsbury, the ambulance is based at the Harrington Street fire station.

Driving through Worcester’s narrow streets, including unpaved residential neighborhoods, is a constant challenge. The DCU area downtown “is a nightmare,” Capt. Wilson said, especially in the afternoon and evening when school buses and commuters are on the road.

“Drivers have gotten better (about letting EMS through),” he said. “But the biggest thing is they don’t come to a stop.” And while bicycles haven’t been much of an obstacle, pedestrians who aren’t in crosswalks and aren’t paying attention present another hazard.

The radio crackled as Capt. Wilson drove around the city in the SUV on a recent weekday afternoon. An iPad on the console showed the location of the ambulances.

A call came in from 67 Belmont St., a medical office building at UMass Memorial’s Memorial Campus. An elderly woman had fallen when coming in from the parking lot, suffering a cut over her eye.

Capt. Wilson turned on the siren in bursts, which has been shown to be more effective in gaining drivers’ attention than a continuous siren, and arrived first on the scene. He jumped out of the SUV, medical bag in hand, and started checking the patient’s condition.

Soon police, firefighters and an ambulance arrived, with paramedics Evan Kirby and Eric Laighton, who took over care of the patient. Although the injury didn’t appear life-threatening, the paramedics placed the woman on a stretcher and took her to St. Vincent Hospital.

The scene was quickly repeated with a call to East Mountain Street, where a man in his 40s was suspected of having a stroke.

In addition to police and firefighters, Worcester EMS paramedics Darren Brock and Andrew Person were on the scene, assisting the patient.

Worcester EMS paramedics started an intravenous line in the patient and transported him to UMass Memorial’s University Campus emergency department.

From the second they arrive at the hospital, EMTs have 20 minutes to check the patient in, bring the patient to the treatment room, give the resource nurse all the necessary medical information, and then clean and prepare their ambulance for the next patient. It’s a precision operation, requiring an ability to focus calmly while multitasking.

Another call came in for a combative patient in an altered state, whom paramedics Patrick Ring and Eddie Murphy interviewed and took to UMass Memorial for an emergency mental health referral.

Capt. Wilson said the number of people in police custody has increased over the years, whether they’re intoxicated or having a mental health crisis.

“It’s important to use your persuasion skills and to listen,” he said. Some communities include social workers with EMTs to help with these calls.

Most of the time, though, Capt. Wilson said, “You see a lot of medical issues. With the baby boomer population, there’s an influx of heart, aging, diabetic, respiratory issues. Everyone who’s young thinks it isn’t going to happen to them, until it happens to them.”

And then there are the motor vehicle crashes, such as the next call. A “rollover with entrapment” was on Acton Street. The driver, a woman who was alone in the car, had been wearing her seat belt and was uninjured as she stood up in the car, which was resting on its driver’s side. Firefighters needed to stabilize the car before they could get her out.

Once she was safely extricated, EMTs sat the woman on a stretcher and assessed her condition, but she declined further treatment.

Capt. Wilson said improved safety features and more people wearing seat belts have cut down on serious vehicle-related injuries. “The biggest thing is, you don’t get ejected from the vehicle if you wear a seat belt,” he said. Injuries suffered in the vehicle are usually minor.

On another afternoon, EMS supervisor Bill Humphrey drove around during an unusually quiet spell, after a nonstop morning. A few calls came in, one for an elderly man with a fever and shortness of breath, and another for a middle-aged woman with suspected seizure who was described as “in an altered state.”

Paramedics, firefighters and police officers efficiently did their jobs, with compassion and attentiveness to each patient. Vital signs were checked and IVs were started.

“It’s a version of the emergency room coming to the patient,” Mr. Humphrey said.

Efforts to professionalize emergency medical services took off in 1976, with the passage of a federal law outlining training and equipment standards. The field has been building research to improve pre-hospital emergency care, which means EMTs must keep training and gaining experience. Among the updated practices, for instance, studies found that backboards generally aren’t as important as a cervical collar to stabilize the spine, for patients under age 65.

EMTs have to be recertified by the state Department of Public Health’s Office of Emergency Medical Services every two years, which requires 60 hours of continuing education.

The wage for new paramedics starts around $16 an hour, according to Mr. Humphrey, and it goes up slowly to around $22 an hour.

“EMS is in its infancy,” he said. “It’s still working on itself.” ___ (c)2017 Telegram & Gazette, Worcester, Mass.

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

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EMTs bring the emergency room to the patient – Worcester Telegram

Susan Spencer Telegram & Gazette Staff @SusanSpencerTG

WORCESTER – They’ve pulled injured people out of burning buildings, performed ice rescues, delivered babies while on the road, started IVs and intubations in the back of a truck, and revived far too many people who have overdosed on opioids with their ever-present supply of Narcan.

Emergency medical technicians, ambulance crews trained to respond quickly to medical emergencies, trauma situations and accidents, are a critical but often overshadowed component of public safety.

They’ll be found working in what one EMT called “a well-choreographed dance” with firefighters and police officers anytime a 911 call comes in. But often the role of emergency medical services as health care providers gets lost from public view in the tidy news summary that a patient was rushed to the hospital.

May 21-27 is the 43rd annual National EMS Week, in which the National Association of EMTs, in partnership with the American College of Emergency Physicians, seeks to recognize the vital contribution of EMTs to community health and safety.

A Telegram & Gazette reporter and photographer rode along with Worcester Emergency Medical Services paramedics this week, getting a view from the road of calamities large and small. On these days, it was mainly the everyday stuff of age, illness and disability – perhaps not dramatic, but the conditions and events that ultimately take their toll on most people.

Worcester EMS is a clinical department of UMass Memorial Medical Center. With approximately 90 paramedics, EMTs who have the highest level of training, Worcester EMS contracts with Worcester and Shrewsbury to provide around-the-clock coverage.

Seven ambulances drive all day in Worcester and four handle the nights. Shrewsbury has one ambulance assigned during the day and one at night, but Worcester will cover for Shrewsbury if needed.

In addition to the ambulances, supervisors, who are also paramedics, ride the streets in two Chevrolet Tahoes or a Suburban, outfitted with communications equipment and medical supply bags, to direct emergency response, coordinate with police and fire departments, or provide backup.

Serious situations or not, Worcester EMS gets 40,000 calls per year between the two communities, averaging 90 to 115 a day, according to Capt. Mark Wilson, one of four captains in charge of the department.

Capt. Wilson has worked with EMS since 1980 when it was operated out of Worcester City Hospital. It moved in 1991 to what was then UMass Medical Center.

“The whole city has changed. Every intersection is different from when I started,” he said.

What used to be eight hospitals receiving emergency patients is now three. The population has increased too, as has the proportion of people who call EMS.

Capt. Wilson said, “People are using the emergency system more as primary care. It’s a lot more busy.”

Emergency 911 calls go to the Worcester Emergency Communications Center, which dispatches to the appropriate agency – fire, police or EMS. Most calls now come in by cellphone, however, and those first get routed to Massachusetts State Police in Weston and then to the local community.

Worcester Regional Transit Authority buses can also radio EMS.

According to Capt. Wilson, the EMS system is moving in the next year to have cellphone calls go to the closest EMS department. Text messages and FaceTime video calls are also on the horizon.

“You can get 15 calls in 45 minutes,” Capt. Wilson said. And although some people call an ambulance so they don’t have to pay for a cab to the hospital, “We’re required to respond, by the commonwealth. We cannot make that judgment over the phone.”

The high volume and variety of calls Worcester EMS handles have made it one of the most active departments in the state and a place where even paramedics from Boston come to sharpen their skills.

Christian Grant, 25, is one of those who started his career with Worcester EMS, then got a full-time job with Boston MedFlight air ambulance. But he still works 30 to 40 hours a week as a per diem paramedic in Worcester.

Waiting for a call at the former Providence Street fire station, one of three ambulance hubs in the city, he said, “One of the bigger things here is you deal with everything. You are on all the calls.”

Violence, drugs, Mr. Grant has worked on it. “This is a very addicting place to work,” he said.

Worcester EMS crews are stationed at garages at 23 Wells St. and UMass Memorial’s University Campus on Lake Avenue, in addition to Providence Street, to get to calls throughout the city as quickly as possible. In Shrewsbury, the ambulance is based at the Harrington Street fire station.

Driving through Worcester’s narrow streets, including unpaved residential neighborhoods, is a constant challenge. The DCU area downtown “is a nightmare,” Capt. Wilson said, especially in the afternoon and evening when school buses and commuters are on the road.

“Drivers have gotten better (about letting EMS through),” he said. “But the biggest thing is they don’t come to a stop.” And while bicycles haven’t been much of an obstacle, pedestrians who aren’t in crosswalks and aren’t paying attention present another hazard.

The radio crackled as Capt. Wilson drove around the city in the SUV on a recent weekday afternoon. An iPad on the console showed the location of the ambulances.

A call came in from 67 Belmont St., a medical office building at UMass Memorial’s Memorial Campus. An elderly woman had fallen when coming in from the parking lot, suffering a cut over her eye.

Capt. Wilson turned on the siren in bursts, which has been shown to be more effective in gaining drivers’ attention than a continuous siren, and arrived first on the scene.He jumped out of the SUV, medical bag in hand, and started checking the patient’s condition.

Soon police, firefighters and an ambulance arrived, with paramedics Evan Kirby and Eric Laighton, who took over care of the patient. Although the injury didn’t appear life-threatening, the paramedics placed the woman on a stretcher and took her to St. Vincent Hospital.

The scene was quickly repeated with a call to East Mountain Street, where a man in his 40s was suspected of having a stroke.

In addition to police and firefighters, Worcester EMS paramedics Darren Brock and Andrew Person were on the scene, assisting the patient.

Worcester EMS paramedics started an intravenous line in the patient and transported him to UMass Memorial’s University Campus emergency department.

From the second they arrive at the hospital, EMTs have 20 minutes to check the patient in, bring the patient to the treatment room, give the resource nurse all the necessary medical information, and then clean and prepare their ambulance for the next patient. It’s a precision operation, requiring an ability to focus calmly while multitasking.

Another call came in for a combative patient in an altered state, whom paramedics Patrick Ring and Eddie Murphy interviewed and took to UMass Memorial for an emergency mental health referral.

Capt. Wilson said the number of people in police custody has increased over the years, whether they’re intoxicated or having a mental health crisis.

“It’s important to use your persuasion skills and to listen,” he said. Some communities include social workers with EMTs to help with these calls.

Most of the time, though, Capt. Wilson said, “You see a lot of medical issues. With the baby boomer population, there’s an influx of heart, aging, diabetic, respiratory issues. Everyone who’s young thinks it isn’t going to happen to them, until it happens to them.”

And then there are the motor vehicle crashes, such as the next call. A “rollover with entrapment” was on Acton Street. The driver, a woman who was alone in the car, had been wearing her seat belt and was uninjured as she stood up in the car, which was resting on its driver’s side. Firefighters needed to stabilize the car before they could get her out.

Once she was safely extricated, EMTs sat the woman on a stretcher and assessed her condition, but she declined further treatment.

Capt. Wilson said improved safety features and more people wearing seat belts have cut down on serious vehicle-related injuries. “The biggest thing is, you don’t get ejected from the vehicle if you wear a seat belt,” he said. Injuries suffered in the vehicle are usually minor.

On another afternoon, EMS supervisor Bill Humphrey drove around during an unusually quiet spell, after a nonstop morning. A few calls came in, one for an elderly man with a fever and shortness of breath, and another for a middle-aged woman with suspected seizure who was described as “in an altered state.”

Paramedics, firefighters and police officers efficiently did their jobs, with compassion and attentiveness to each patient. Vital signs were checked and IVs were started.

“It’s a version of the emergency room coming to the patient,” Mr. Humphrey said.

Efforts to professionalize emergency medical services took off in 1976, with the passage of a federal law outlining training and equipment standards. The field has been building research to improve pre-hospital emergency care, which means EMTs must keep training and gaining experience. Among the updated practices, for instance, studies found that backboards generally aren’t as important as a cervical collar to stabilize the spine, for patients under age 65.

EMTs have to be recertified by the state Department of Public Health’s Office of Emergency Medical Services every two years, which requires 60 hours of continuing education.

The wage for new paramedics starts around $16 an hour, according to Mr. Humphrey, and it goes up slowly to around $22 an hour.

“EMS is in its infancy,” he said. “It’s still working on itself.”

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EMTs bring the emergency room to the patient – Worcester Telegram

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Nestle Purina gives $30K to Trinity emergency room – Fort Dodge Messenger

Nestle Purina, through its Fort Dodge manufacturing facility, donated $30,000 towards the Emergency Room construction and renovation at Trinity Regional Medical Center. The donation enabled the hospital to renovate the Physician Sleep Room, which will help give physicians the rest they need when working long, overnight hours in the ER.

We would like to thank Nestle Purina for their generosity. We see approximately 23,0 00 patients in the Emergency Room at Trinity Regional Medical Center each year, and this donation will help us meet the needs of those patients and the entire community when they need medical care, said Mike Dewerff, president and chief executive officer of UnityPoint Health Fort Dodge.

The hospital has completed the final stages of the Emergency Department project that included new construction and a complete remodel of the existing Emergency Room space. The first phase was completed April 14, 2016, and the Physician Sleep Room was one of the last remaining projects for the second phase of the Emergency Department project. The entire project was completed early this year.

We take seriously our role in helping make the communities where our employees live and work the very best they can be, said Eric Dobson, Purina plant manager. We are proud to join with other local businesses and donors to support the outstanding service Trinity Regional Medical Center provides to our neighbors in the Fort Dodge area.

Nestle Purina, which employs more than 200 people at its Fort Dodge plant, has a long history of supporting the local community, and actively supports many area organizations including the United Way, Almost Home Animal Shelter, American Heart Association, American Cancer Society-Relay for Life, Fort Dodge Community School Foundation and the Fort Dodge Public Library.

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UH to open emergency room in Kent – Ravenna Record Courier

Free-standing facility to open this summer at S.R. 43 and 261 By BOB GAETJENS Staff Writer Published: May 21, 2017 4:00 AM

University Hospitals will open a free-standing emergency department in Kent this summer, cutting response times nearly in half for area rescue crews.

From the time of an emergency call to being put back in service, an ambulance can be unavailable for up to 90 minutes, Brimfield Chief Craig Mullaly said. Having the new emergency department at will cut that time in half.

“I think this a good, positive thing, definitely,” he said. “Once they are open, they’re an ER. If, worse case scenario, we have something where we have go to the closest facility, they have that life-saving ability.”

The facility will be at the corner of S.R. 43 and S.R. 261 and is expected to open summer, possibly in July, UH officials said.

According to Kent Fire Lt. Patrick Edwards, the biggest advantage of the new center will be the ability to quickly return ambulances to service.

“The patient obviously will get in quicker, and it will enable us to get back into service quicker,” he said. “That’s a huge benefit to us. You’re talking a 5-minute transfer from basically anywhere in the city.”

Joe Wilson, manager of facilities operations for UH, agrees.

He said ambulances often are called for non-life threatening injuries. During the time an ambulance is serving someone with a minor injury, someone else in the community may be having a stroke or heart attack, cases in which timeliness is important.

Tom Conner, director of ambulatory service for UH, agreed that time is a key factor.

“Easier, faster access to emergency care increases your chances of a better outcome,” he said.

Conner said he believes the facility will get patients from Kent, Brimfield, Tallmadge, Stow and maybe some from Rootstown, although UH Portage Medical Center in Ravenna is about the same distance for Rootstown.

The new emergency department will be located in an existing facility that’s been out of use since about 2009, according to Richard Blasko, director of hospital services for UH.

After undergoing about $6.5 million in renovations, the 14,000-square-foot facility will include a large canopy facing S.R. 43 forfive ambulance spaces, according to William Benoit, chief operating officer at UH Portage Medical Center in Ravenna. In the rear of the building is a large parking lot with an entrance for patients who drive to the facility.

According to Wilson, the facility will include eight beds on the emergency department side and six beds on the urgent care side.

Upon arrival, all cases will be treated as emergencies in compliance with federal guidelines, according to Benoit, but as soon as patients sign in, they’ll enter triage where they will be evaluated. More serious cases will remain in the emergency department and minor problems will be sent to the urgent care side of the facility.

“For urgent care, think primary physicians,” he said. “We’ll be able to treat pretty much anything in the emergency department that we’d be able to treat in the ER and the hospital.”

More serious cases likely will be transferred to other hospitals after patients are stabilized, which is where UH has an advantage, Conner said.

“We can send them to Portage if we can provide that service,” he said. “We can send them anywhere in the UH system, to Ahuja (in Beechwood), to Cleveland; it just depends on the level of service needed.”

According to Wilson, the facility will include two specialized areas, one providing obstetrics and gynecological services, which will serve as a rape crisis center, the other for decontaminating people covered in chemicals or other hazardous materials. That area is completely self-contained so hazardous materials do not get into the rest of the facility. The unit includes a shower and is designed to aid patients who’ve experienced industrial accidents involving things like asbestos, PCBs or other harmful chemicals.

The emergency department’s proximity to the medical arts building next door, also owned by UH, will provide access to an imaging center, including MRI, X-rays, a full CT and other services, according to Wilson. That building will be accessible by a walkway, which will be the final part of the renovation.

Benoit said the new emergency department likely will create about 100 new jobs in Kent. At any one time, there will be one full physician, one mid-level care provider, four or five nurses, several paramedics and various support staff on duty.

Email: bgaetjens@recordpub.com

Phone: 330-541-9440

Twitter: @bobgaetjens_rpc

Facebook: Bob Gaetjens

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Health czar: More urgent care centers could ease long ER wait times – Boston Herald

Chronic overcrowding at some Boston emergency rooms could be alleviated by giving more addicts and behavioral health patients access to primary care or urgent care, the states secretary of Health and Human Services said today.

Its the access issue. People are going to emergency rooms for what should be primary or urgent care, Marylou Sudders said on Herald Radios Morning Meeting program. I would like to see us create more urgent care centers. Theres not an urgent care center in Massachusetts that sees people with behavioral health or addiction issues.

On Monday, the Herald reported emergency patients at Boston Medical Center and Brigham and Womens Hospital wait nearly an hour on average to be seen, twice the national average of 30 minutes, according to government Medicare and Medicaid data.

Expanded Medicaid coverage under Obamacare has exacerbated the problem, with hospitals forced to operate at nearly-full capacity to make up for the lower profits from those patients, analysts say.

Sudders said today the crowding could be lessened with a focus on getting non-urgent issues out of emergency room and into primary care or health centers, and (using) the ER for what you and I would think of as real emergencies.

The secretary also cited dental care as a condition that should be diverted away from ERs.

However, she noted there is a positive side to the surge of overdose patients in area ERs.

We have a higher rate of people with addictions being transported to emergency rooms. Thats not a bad thing because someone is being NARCANNed and discovered, Sudders said. For me, that provides an opportunity to change someones trajectory.

Expanding access to primary care and urgent care, as opposed to a reliance on emergency rooms, will require federal support, Sudders said.

Expanding primary care, expanding someones ability to get in to see a primary care physician, coverage that helps pay for it we have to make sure we get the right care at the right time and the right place, she said, and thats a conversation I hope we can have with Congress and within our own state.

Sudders also weighed in on a proposal before a legislative committee to raise the legal age for using tobacco, which Senate President Stanley C. Rosenberg said yesterday is gaining steam on Beacon Hill.

The evidence is strong about smoking and pregnancy and the potential for low birthweight babies and other complications, so I am supportive of raising the age across the state to 21, Sudders said. If it gets to the governors desk, I think he will look at it quite seriously.

Sudders pointed to the city of Boston and other municipalities which have moved the age for tobacco sales from 18 to 21 and concurred with Rosenthals assessment that the issue has gained this interesting traction to it.

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Docs, Dems warn Boston emergency room lines will grow if GOP health bill passes – Boston Herald

Bay State lawmakers and doctors warn that the GOPs health care bill threatens to worsen the emergency room overcrowding crisis, which the Herald reported yesterday has led to wait times in the city that are double the national average.

It is a very serious concern, because that has important health care consequences, but its also a question about resources, said Bay State U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren. Thats why I am fighting so hard against the Republican plan to tear up our health care system, because they would actually leave us with fewer health care resources, which means longer waits in all of our hospitals.

According to a Herald special report on emergency rooms, the departments at Boston Medical Center and Brigham and Womens Hospital have wait times of nearly an hour twice as long as the national average.

Massachusetts General Hospital takes two times longer than hospitals nationwide to get ER patients into inpatient treatment.

The American Health Care Act, which cleared the House earlier this month, would scale back the Medicaid coverage that saw a massive expansion under Obamacare.

This has spurred concern that fewer people would have access to primary care physicians, forcing more patients to use emergency services as their only alternative.

The language of the bill could change as it moves through Congress, but the Chief of Emergency Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, Dr. David Brown, said as currently written, the health care bill would, among other things, severely cut federal support for Medicaid programs and leave millions without any health insurance at all.

He added, The nations emergency departments, which already serve as a major safety net in health care, will become even more overcrowded than they currently are. This will no doubt impact the quality of care and patient experience.

But Bay State U.S. Rep. Stephen Lynch said Obamacare has caused its own set of problems, one being that hospitals have been forced to operate at full capacity because of the increasing number of Medicaid patients.

Lynch said he plans to reach out to local hospitals to get a sense of what can be done to fix the issue.

Im not surprised its gotten worse, Lynch added, but that doesnt absolve us of the responsibility of fixing the problem, you want to make sure people have access to good doctors and good hospitals in a timely fashion.

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Docs, Dems warn Boston emergency room lines will grow if GOP health bill passes – Boston Herald

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