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Ortho RI Express Provides Immediate Orthopedic CareSaving … – Business Wire (press release)

PROVIDENCE, R.I.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Ortho RI, Rhode Islands largest orthopedic care provider, offers patients with orthopedic injuries a better alternative to care through its Ortho RI Express immediate care centers. With fall sports just starting and winter around the corner, injuries needing immediate attention are bound to happen.

When a patient gets injured, whether in soccer practice or slipping on the ice, often the only care option involves long waits at the emergency room or urgent care center, said Michael Bradley, MD, President and CEO of Ortho RI. But they are not staffed with orthopedists so patients are often referred out for specialized care. The result is more long waits, extra fees and copays and delayed care.

Ortho RI Express offers an alternative: immediate care from orthopedic specialists for acute situations, available after hours and on Saturday. All four locations are staffed with Ortho RI physicians and physician assistants, with an orthopedic surgeon on call at all times. Patients benefit from their better understanding of orthopedic injuries and faster care. An Ortho RI visit is billed as a specialist office visit instead of the higher emergency room or urgent care visit.

Ortho RI Express eliminates unnecessary emergency room visits for sprains, strains and fractures, Bradley said. With fall school sports just beginning, the timing couldnt be better to remind families there is a one-stop, lower-cost, better-care alternative.

There are Ortho RI Express locations in Providence, Pawtucket, Warwick and Wakefield. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, with evening hours 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturday hours 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. at select locations. Patients may call ahead as soon as the injury occurs and be seen within 15 minutes of their appointment time. The number is 401-777-7000.

Learn more at orthopedicsri.com/ortho-ri-express

About Ortho RIOrtho RI advances orthopedic care through patient-centered comprehensive musculoskeletal care with 14 community locations, more than 55 orthopedic specialists and more than 55 therapists and trainers. Their areas of expertise include: hand, joint, pain management, shoulder, spine, sports medicine, joint reconstruction, primary care sports medicine and podiatry. Ortho Rhode Island also offers physical and occupational therapy, athletic training, MRI and ultrasound imaging, and durable medical equipment.

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Report finds many emergency room visits are avoidable – ConsumerAffairs

When an accident or injury occurs, its second nature for consumers to go to the emergency room (ER) for treatment. But a new report finds that some of these visits arent necessary or advisable.

In a recent study, researchers from California deemed that 3.5% of all U.S. emergency roomvisits were avoidable. They say that the top three discharge diagnoses were alcohol abuse, dental disorders, and mood disorders, such as anxiety and depression. While some of these conditions can be serious, the authors note that the ER is not always necessarily the best place to have them treated.

Our most striking finding is that a significant number of avoidable visits are for conditions the ED is not equipped to treat. Emergency physicians are trained to treat life- and limb-threatening emergencies, making it inefficient for patients with mental health, substance abuse, or dental disorders to be treated in this setting, they said.

The study analyzed over 424 million visits made to emergency departments across the U.S. between 2005 and 2011 for patients aged 18 to 64. Avoidable cases were defined as those that did not require diagnostic or screening services, procedures, or medications, and led to patients being discharged home.

Of these visits, the researchers say that 6.8% were related to alcohol abuse or mood disorders, while 3.9% were connected to disorders with patients teeth or jaws. While the majorityof these visits did warrant emergency attention, the results indicated that 16.9% of mood disorder visits, 10.4% of alcohol-related visits, and 4.9% of tooth and jaw-related visits were avoidable.

While visiting the ER might seem like the safest move, the researchers note that extraneous visits can impact the overall cost of health insurance for all consumers. They believe that their results may indicate a need to increase public access to mental health services and dental care.

Our findings serve as a start to addressing gaps in the US healthcare system, rather than penalizing patients for lack of access, and may be a better step to decreasing avoidable ED visits, the researchers concluded.

The full study has been published in the International Journal for Quality in Health Care.

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Machias Hospital Expands and Modernizes Emergency Department – WABI

MACHIAS, Maine (WABI) Built over 50 years ago — the Emergency Department at Down East Community Hospital annually treats nine thousand patients — significantly above the capacity it was designed to handle.

Dennis Welsh, President and CEO of Down East Community Hospital says, “This really offers up a lot of space for our patients. Before we were woefully inadequate with regards to space in the E.D. We often had patients lined up in the hallways. It was very busy. We’ve seen continued growth in E.D. services here and I think this will create a completely improved environment for our patients.”

The new Emergency Department has three times the space…and has grown from six beds to nine.

Welsh says, “Hospitals today, a lot of them were built 30, 40, 50 years ago so, when we look at new construction in the new add on it’s up to current times.”

Modern upgrades for the facility include a behavioral health room.

Welsh says, “We have folks coming in for detox or other substance abuse issues, so we’ve created this behavioral health room and it’s really kind of a lock-down room that’s comfortable and quiet. It’s very safe for the patient.”

They also have a negative pressure room for folks with infectious diseases and a new decontamination area.

He says, “They’re large showers that we can put patients in in case of chemical spills or other emergency disasters.”

As the only hospital in a 60-mile radius of Machias, hospital staff say it’s a much needed upgrade for the community.

Kevin McEwan, Chief Nursing Officer says, “We are a very busy community — so there was a demand here in the community to upgrade these services and not have our community drive and hour and a half or two hours to get these services.”

Welsh says, “We have one final phase left. It should be about 4 weeks. We’ll be 100 percent by the end of October and we’ll actually start seeing patients we think early next week in this space.”

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Clinic serving Aransas Pass area 24-7 – kiiitv.com

As you might imagine, Hurricane Harvey knocked out medical services in the hardest hit areas, and damage at the hospital in Aransas Pass left residents with no emergency room within 30 miles.

Rudy Trevino, KIII 8:04 PM. CDT September 04, 2017

ARANSAS PASS (KIII NEWS) – As you might imagine, Hurricane Harvey knocked out medical services in the hardest hit areas, and damage at the hospital in Aransas Pass left residents with no emergency room within 30 miles.

However, some Dallas doctors have now set up a new clinic where it is needed most, and if patients cant pay, the services are free.

We just opened our doors over here at the beginning of August, said Dr. Carrie de Moor, CEO of Code Three Emergency Partners, a brand new urgent care clinic that has seen a good share of emergencies in just the last week.

50 patients already so far this morning, De Moor said. As people start coming back into town and get hurt. We’re taking care of walking wounded. We’re taking care of anything thats an emergency.

They’ve even got an outdoor walk-up immunization desk for tetanus shots.

Inside, only two exam rooms are up and running. The rest of the building is still being worked on in hopes of opening that section of the building as soon as possible.

We built this facility actually because we knew this was an underserved community to begin with, and now we’re the only ones left standing in this general vicinity and the county to take care of anybody, said Dr. De Moor.

The two-room clinic is staffed with several ER doctors equipped with X-ray, ultrasound and a lab, all up and running thanks to generators and a caring staff.

Code Three doctors will be open 24-7, and regardless of a patients ability to pay, no one will be turned away.

2017 KIII-TV

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Atrovent albuterol wheezing emergency room – Atrovent nebulizer for infants – Twin Cities Arts Reader

Adam Jacobs (Aladdin) and Isabelle McCalla (Jasmine) star in the national touring production of Aladdin. Photo by Deen van Meer.How many people does it take to put on a national tour of a Broadway show? If the show isAladdin, the answer is 75…if you only count the people who show

The Catalyst Quartet rehearsing.It was the first of August. Dr. Deborah Justice was settling in for a month of fiddling around musically speaking when the email arrived. “Im afraid I have some sad news from Caracas,” it began. “Venezuela at this moment is now a war zone.”At that

The late J. Otis Powell.Poet, playwright, and overall multi-talented artist J. Otis Powell died on Monday, August 28. Powell was 61 years’ old, and had been awarded a Sally Ordway Irvine Award for Commitment just five days prior. He had struggled with ill health, and received a kidney transplant several

A bar chart showing historical box office totals for the Minnesota Fringe Festival.The Minnesota Fringe Festival announced the final statistics today for the 2017 Minnesota Fringe Festival. The 11-day festival brought in 46,076 butts-in-seats, spread across 860 performances of 167 shows at 17 venues in Minneapolis.Why Count Butts-in-Seats?Since 2016, the

The Ordway Center for the Performing Arts announced today the recipients of the 25th annual Sally Ordway Irvine Awards. These awards were given in five categories to recipients from across the State of Minnesota. This year’s recipients are all based in the Twin Cities metro area: Hunter Gullickson (Arts Access)

Actors Gary Briggle (left) and Wendy Lehr (right). Photo by Keith Bridges.The playwright A.R. Gurney passed away two months ago. Many of the various eulogies and obituaries cited his 1988 playLove Letters, a tale of charmed correspondence that was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize.Love Letters encapsulated many of the themes

Lady Gaga rocked the Xcel Energy Center with her trademark costume-heavy, immersive performance. Here’s the set list from the concert:Act I “Video Intro” “Diamond Heart” “A-Yo” “Poker Face” “Perfect Illusion”Act II “John Wayne” “Scheie” “Alejandro”Act III “Horns” “Just Dance” “LoveGame” “Telephone”Act IV “Claws” “Applause” “Come to Mama” “The Edge of

A mosaic of different graphs of Fringe Festival sold-out attendance data.It’s been one week since the 2017 Minnesota Fringe Festival closed its doors and the Fringe staff are still tallying and double-checking festival data. While a fuller report on the festival box office is still forthcoming, here are six figures

Women dancing inArabian Nights.Photo by Dan Van Meer.The Orpheum Theatre is getting a magic lamp. Starting September 15, the Orpheum will host the Broadway touring production of Aladdin for three and a half weeks (closing October 8). This touring production stars Adam Jacobs, who originated the title role of Aladdin

Actress-musician-songwriter Claire Wellin. Photo by Tiffany Topol.This Friday, Claire Wellin is bringing her band Youth in a Roman Field to Icehouse in Minneapolis. Youth in a Roman Field’s “ghost folk” sound emphasizes haunting strings, acoustic instruments, and multipart vocal writing. The MSU-Mankato graduate spoke with the Arts Reader’sBasil Considine about

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Emergency room crews learn to spot elder abuse – LA Daily News

Abuse often leads to depression and medical problems in older patients even death within a year of an abusive incident.

Yet, those subjected to emotional, physical or financial abuse too often remain silent. Identifying victims and intervening poses challenges for doctors and nurses.

Because visits to the emergency room may be the only time an older adult leaves the house, staff in the ER can be a first line of defense, said Tony Rosen, founder and lead investigator of the Vulnerable Elder Protection Team (VEPT), a program launched in April at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center ER.

The most common kinds of elder abuse are emotional and financial, Rosen said, and usually when one form of abuse exists, so do others. According to a New York study, as few as 1 in 24 cases of abuse against residents age 60 and older were reported to authorities.

The VEPT program initially funded by a small grant from The John A. Hartford Foundation (a Kaiser Health News funder) and now fully funded by the Fan Fox and Leslie R. Samuels Foundation includes Presbyterian Hospital emergency physicians Tony Rosen, Mary Mulcare and Michael Stern. These three doctors and two social workers take turns being on call to respond to signs of elder abuse. Also available when needed are psychiatrists, legal and ethical advisers, radiologists, geriatricians and security and patient-services personnel.

We work at making awareness of elder abuse part of the culture in our emergency room by training the entire staff in how to recognize it, said Rosen. Its easy for the ER staff to alert the VEPT team and begin an investigation, he said.

A doctor interviews the patient and conducts a head-to-toe physical exam looking for bruises, lacerations, abrasions, areas of pain and tenderness. Additional testing is ordered if the doctor suspects abuse.

Unlike with child abuse victims, where there is a standard protocol in place for screening, there is no equivalent for the elderly, but we have designed and are evaluating one, said Rosen.

The team looks for specific injuries. For example, radiographic images show old and new fractures, which suggest a pattern of multiple traumatic events. Specific types of fractures may indicate abuse, such as midshaft fractures in the ulna, a forearm bone that can break when an older adult holds his arm in front of his face to protect himself.

When signs of abuse are found but the elder is not interested in cooperating with finding a safe place or getting help, a psychiatrist is asked to determine if that elder has decision-making capacity. The team offers resources but can do little more if the patient isnt interested. They would have to allow the patient to return to the potentially unsafe situation.

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Patients who are in immediate danger and want help or are found not to have capacity may be admitted to the hospital and placed in the care of a geriatrician until a solution can be found. Unlike with children and Child Protective Services, Adult Protective Services wont become involved until a patient has been discharged, so hospitalization can play an important role in keeping older adults safe.

During the first three months of the program, more than 35 elders showed signs of abuse, and a large percentage of them were later confirmed to be victims. Changes in housing or living situations were made for several of them.

Its difficult to identify and measure appropriate outcomes for elder abuse victims, because each patient may have different care goals, said Rosen, but we are working on making a case that detection of elder abuse and intervention in the ER will improve the patients lives. We also hope to show that it will save money, because when an elder is in a safe place, expensive, frequent trips to the ER may no longer be needed.

The teams ultimate goal is to optimize acute care for these vulnerable victims and ensure their safety. They plan to work at continually tweaking VEPT to improve the program and to connect to emergency medical, law enforcement and criminal justice services. Eventually, they hope to help other emergency departments set up similar programs.

This story was produced by Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation.

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In A Houston Emergency Room, It Was A Week Like No Other – NPR

Dr. Winston Watkins, an internist at St. Joseph Medical Center in Houston, volunteered to do a shift in the ER to give his colleagues a break. Rachel Osier Lindley/KERA hide caption

Dr. Winston Watkins, an internist at St. Joseph Medical Center in Houston, volunteered to do a shift in the ER to give his colleagues a break.

St. Joseph Medical Center is downtown Houston’s only hospital, located just down the street from the convention center where thousands of evacuees have been staying since Harvey hit.

As of Friday, some doctors and nurses have been on the clock for almost a full week.

Trent Tankersley, director of emergency services at St. Joseph Medical Center in downtown Houston, had a very long work week, as did many of his colleagues. Rachel Osier Lindley/KERA hide caption

Trent Tankersley, director of emergency services at St. Joseph Medical Center in downtown Houston, had a very long work week, as did many of his colleagues.

When you’re working in an ER during a major natural disaster, nothing is routine. Trent Tankersley, director of emergency services at St. Joseph Medical Center, describes one tense situation after another in the hospital this week.

“We had a lady who the only vehicle heavy enough and strong enough to get to her through the floodwaters was a dump truck. She was pregnant. She was in labor. She was brought to the hospital in the dump bed of a dump truck, soaking wet.

“As we were getting her over to the women’s building to get taken care of, we had a trauma come in. Shortly after that, we had a young man [who] came in that was having a stroke.”

Tankersley showed up to work Saturday, and hasn’t had what you’d consider “a break” since.

“Finally got to go home last night for a couple hours and do some laundry and then came right back. So it’s been an interesting five or six days.”

Some staff haven’t been home since before Harvey struck

Kristen Benjamin, an associate chief nursing officer, has been right beside Tankersley.

“I think we’re all working on adrenaline right now. We’re working shift by shift. Some people are doing 15-, 16-hour shifts. We let them go off and sleep. They come back in.”

Kristen Benjamin, associate chief nursing officer at St. Joseph Medical Center, says many employees hadn’t been home to see if their houses were flooded. Rachel Osier Lindley/KERA hide caption

Kristen Benjamin, associate chief nursing officer at St. Joseph Medical Center, says many employees hadn’t been home to see if their houses were flooded.

They’ve seen more than 600 patients in the first five days. At times, they saw more patients in a few hours than they usually would in a whole day.

Many staffers have been stuck at the hospital, with no clear path to their homes. As floodwaters recede, their coworkers can finally come back.

“We’re going to start transitioning staff out to get home so that they can check on their homes,” Benjamin says. “Because some of them don’t even know what’s happening at their house right now because they haven’t been home since Friday. So I don’t even really have an idea if their house has been flooded or not.”

His first day working in the ER

Among those staffing the ER are doctors from other departments pitching in, and even medical students, like Diana Johnson. She and her classmates are using a Google spreadsheet to organize shifts to help.

She’s in her third year at Houston’s McGovern Medical school. She’s assisting Dr. Winston Watkins, an internist on his first day in the ER.

“One of the first patients that came in happened to be one of my own patients from my practice, and he came in with his foot hurting,” he says.”So Diana evaluated him and it turns out he has gangrene of his right fourth toe. And so we’re going to admit him to the hospital.”

“Some of them don’t even know what’s happening at their house right now because they haven’t been home since Friday.”

His house is underwater

Nurse Aaron Padron says he’s never seen such a wide range of emotions in the ER.

“A lot of laughter crying yelling, tears,” he says. “People that you work with you think that wouldn’t crack just put their head in their hands and take a second to cry to themselves, or not to themselves, and wipe away the tears and get back to work.”

He’s been working here for most of the last week, except Saturday night.

Aaron Padron, an emergency room nurse, says hospital employees were much more emotional, reflecting the stresses on everyone in the city. Rachel Osier Lindley/KERA hide caption

Aaron Padron, an emergency room nurse, says hospital employees were much more emotional, reflecting the stresses on everyone in the city.

“I went home on Saturday to sort of rescue my family before the floods got too high for me to get in or out,” he says. “And then I came back Sunday and I’ve been working and sleeping here ever since.”

Neighbors say his house is underwater. He says several others working in the ER saw their homes flooded. In a way, he says, it’s all been a transformational experience.

“I think times of crisis, in times of emergency, in times of stress really have a way to bring people together and create a lot of camaraderie and really can push people to excel at what they do,” he says.

Once reinforcements come in, he’ll be able to rotate off his shift and find out just how much his family lost.

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Video Shows Utah Nurse Handcuffed After Refusing to Draw Patient’s Blood – New York Times

She took a few steps back and screamed, Somebody help me! as Officer Payne pushed her through two sets of doors out of the emergency room and outdoors, twisted her so she was partly facing a wall and placed her in handcuffs.

Excerpts from the video, which came to light at a news conference by Ms. Wubbels and her lawyer on Thursday, gained widespread attention.

The video led to apologies from the mayor of Salt Lake City, Jackie Biskupski, and the police chief, Mike Brown, on Friday and an outpouring of support for Ms. Wubbels, 41. Investigations by the Police Departments Internal Affairs unit and the citys Civilian Review Board are also underway, the mayor said in a statement.

These are officers of the peace, Ms. Wubbels said in an interview on Friday. There was nothing peaceful about this incident.

The episode unfolded on July 26 as the Salt Lake City police were helping another police department in an investigation of a driver who had crashed into another vehicle while fleeing the police. The fleeing driver was killed, according to a report filed by Officer Payne, and the other driver was flown to Utah Hospital.

Officer Payne wrote that he was seeking to draw blood from the patient to check if he had any chemical substances in his system at the time of the crash, though it was not clear why.

He wrote that he spoke with Ms. Wubbels, who was the nurse in charge in the burn unit, and tried to explain the exigent circumstances of the request.

The confrontation intensified as they headed to the emergency room from the burn unit upstairs.

Im just being told what to do by my entire hospital, she said, referring to her administrators.

Officer Payne responded, And Im being told what to do by my boss, and Im going to do what my boss says.

Officer Payne could not be reached on Friday. Chief Brown said in a statement on Friday that he was alarmed by the video.

I want to be clear, we take this very seriously, he said, adding, Within 24 hours of this incident, Salt Lake City Police Department took steps to ensure this will never happen again.

The chief said that Officer Payne had been suspended from the blood draw program, in which officers are trained as phlebotomists to take blood samples, and that a new policy had been put in place. The Salt Lake Tribune reported that Officer Payne remained on duty with the Police Department.

Ms. Wubbels, a nurse at the hospital since 2009, said she was adhering to hospital policies and the law. The United States Supreme Court has ruled that the police do not have the right to draw blood in drunken-driving investigations without a warrant.

It wasnt like she decided she was a constitutional scholar, her lawyer, Karra J. Porter, said in an interview on Friday.

No charges were filed against Ms. Wubbels, who was in handcuffs for about 20 minutes before being released. Ms. Wubbels said she wanted to use the episode to educate medical professionals and the police and to open a civic dialogue.

University of Utah Health, which runs the hospital, supports Ms. Wubbels and is proud of her decision to focus first and foremost on the care and well-being of her patient, Kathy Wilets, a spokeswoman, said in an email. She followed procedures and protocols in this matter and was acting in her patients best interest.

Ms. Biskupski said that efforts to get the police to increase the use of de-escalation techniques have been successful but that this incident is a troubling setback.

Robert J. Louden, a retired chief hostage negotiator with the New York Police Department and a professor emeritus of criminal justice and homeland security at Georgian Court University in New Jersey, watched the video and said in an interview on Friday that Ms. Wubbels was an absolute professional.

Officer Payne was 100 percent not correct, he said, adding, It seems to me hes in need of an attitude adjustment.

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Video Shows Utah Nurse Handcuffed After Refusing to Draw Patient’s Blood – New York Times

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Only 3% of emergency room visits may truly be avoidable, study … – FierceHealthcare

Though many emergency rooms are overcrowded and some patients may not have urgent needs, just a fraction of visits are truly avoidable, according to a new study.

Researchers examined datafrom the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 2005 to 2011 that included more than 115,000 records representing 424 million emergency department visits, and found that only 3.3% were avoidable.The study team defined avoidable visits as thosethat did not require diagnostic tests, screenings, procedures or medications.

A number of these avoidable visits were for concerns that the ER is not equipped to treat, like dental or mental health issues, according to the study. Of the avoidable visits, 6.8% were for alcohol- or mood-related disorders, like depression or anxiety, while 3.9% were for dental conditions.

RELATED:4 strategies to reduce ER overcrowding

The findings, published in the International Journal for Quality in Health Care,challenge the commonly held belief that many people visit the ER needlessly, said RebeccaParker, M.D., president of the American College of Emergency Physicians, in an announcement.

Despite a relentless campaign by the insurance industry to mislead policymakers and the public into believing that many ER visits are avoidable, the facts say otherwise, Parker said. Most patients who are in the emergency department belong there and insurers should cover those visits. The myths about unnecessary ER visits are just thatmyths.

RELATED: ER visits offer a teachable moment to reduce drug use

The ER has been a frequent target for initiatives seeking to reduce overuse and the costs associated with emergency care. However, the researchers saidthat their findings point more toward the value in programs to improve patient access to services like mental health and dental care.

The study found that 10.4% of visits from patients with alcohol-related disorders and 16.9% of visits from patients with mood disorders were avoidable, suggesting that policymakers could do more to increase access to the services that would keep those patients out of the ER.

Our findings serve as a start to addressing gaps in the U.S. healthcare system, rather than penalizing patients for lack of access, and may be a better step to decreasing avoidable ED visits, the authors wrote.

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Police: Emergency room doctor, five others arrested in ‘major … – KATU – KATU

by Joe Douglass, KATU News

From left to right: Mark Rose, 61, George Nelson, 42, and Jeremiah Hart, 42. Police said the three men and three other suspects were arrested this week for allegedly taking part in an illegal butane hash oil manufacturing operation.

Police said an emergency room doctor and five other people were arrested in a major drug bust in Linn and Benton counties this week.

Officers said Dr. Mark Rose, 61, is not accused of committing crimes on the job but KATU discovered he is facing repercussions professionally.

Rose and others are accused of illegally manufacturing butane hash oil, also known as butane honey oil, BHO or dab. The substance is a concentrated byproduct of marijuana that’s extracted through a highly-flammable, potentially dangerous process.

“We know it’s a highly-lucrative business. We know that there’s a lot of money to be made,” Captain Eric Carter, of the Albany Police Department, told KATU on Thursday.

He said a major drug bust at two locations started at a property on the 36000 block of Crackerneck Drive in Scio Monday morning. Carter said inside a barn officers from the Linn County Interagency Narcotic Enforcement Team found a lab manufacturing butane hash oil.

“What really sets this apart is this was a commercial-grade operation,” Carter explained. “What was missing in this operation is they weren’t licensed or sanctioned by the state to produce the BHO.”

At the Scio location, Carter said two men, George Nelson, 42, and Jeremiah Hart, 42, were arrested on suspicion of illegally manufacturing and having marijuana. He said Hart also had ecstasy.

Three other people were cited for frequenting the location and released, according to police.

“The (lab) in Scio was actually completing a process when the search warrant was executed,” Carter said.

Around 1 a.m. on Tuesday, carter said officers paid a visit to Rose’s house on the 2700 block of Marshall Drive in Corvallis.

There he said they found another lab and three 55-gallon drums worth of marijuana.

Carter said Rose was linked with both operations.

“The property in Scio belongs to him,” Carter explained. “And so he owns the property and knew of the people that were on that property manufacturing BHO.”

At the Scio location, Carter said officers found 6.5 pounds of finished butane hash oil product with a street value of about $115,000.

“We’re trying to close the loop on exactly where it was being distributed at,” Carter said. “We know from the investigation it was illegally being sold by people and we also have indications that we’re following up on that it was also being sold to marijuana dispensaries in the Willamette Valley.”

A spokesman for Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital told KATU due to his arrest Rose is suspended from his job as an ER doctor pending further investigation. The CEO of the hospital said Rose has worked there for 13 years.

A deputy at the Linn County jail said Rose posted $111,500 bail on Tuesday and was released. He’s due in court on Sept. 6.

Below are the charges faced by those arrested in the raids:

– Nelson was booked on manufacturing marijuana, delivering marijuana and possession of more than 4 ounces of marijuana.

– Hart faces manufacturing marijuana, possession of more than 4 ounces of marijuana and possession of ecstasy charges.

– Rose faces two counts of manufacturing marijuana, two counts of delivering marijuana and two counts of possession of more than 4 ounces of marijuana.

– Jennifer Marie Pechar, 40, of Scio, was cited for possession of methamphetamine and frequenting a place where controlled substances are used.

– Kimberly Jeanet Wolf, 36, of Lebanon, was cited for frequenting a place where controlled substances are used.

– James Eugene Mobley, 33, of Lebanon was cited for frequenting a place where controlled substances are used.

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